Giants’ secret weapon Tyler LaTorre ready to lift Team Italy to top of 2013 World Baseball Classic

Team Italy catcher Tyler LaTorre was instrumental in the Italians' conquest of their third consecutive European Championship.
Team Italy catcher Tyler LaTorre was instrumental in the Italians’ conquest of their
third consecutive European Championship by defeating IBAF #7 ranked Netherlands.
SF Giants managerial assistant Tom Trebelhorn
SF Giants managerial assistant Tom Trebelhorn encouraged Tyler LaTorre to play for Team Italy.
Inspired by the power of suggestion from 2009 Team Italy bench coach and current Giants’ Spring Training / Short Season Single-A affiliate Salem-Keizer Volcanoes managerial assistant Tom Trebelhorn to join the Italian national team, 29-year-old catcher Tyler LaTorre takes his strong 2012 campaign for Triple-A Fresno Grizzlies and Team Italy in the European Championship into the 2013 World Baseball Classic beginning March 7th. After winning their third consecutive European Championship, the Italians
are now positioned at #9 in the IBAF 2012 (year-end) Men’s World Ranking.

The WBC Championship Round begins March 17th at AT&T Park in San Francisco.
World Baseball Classic Championship Round play begins March 17th at AT&T Park in San Francisco.
Nothing would make the Santa Cruz-born LaTorre more excited than Italy advancing to his home turf in the Bay Area for the World Baseball Classic Championship Round at AT&T Park in San Francisco. The Giants prospect, who signed as a free agent in 2006, has earned the right to play in front
of his hometown crowd after nearly winning Euro Championship tourney MVP honors. Eight of his 14 hits (14-for-28, .500 BA) were for extra bases (six doubles and two home runs). He absolutely raked at the plate, knocking in nine RBI and scoring nine times.
Tyler LaTorre playing for the Triple-A Fresno Grizzlies on May 24, 2011.
Giants minor leaguer Tyler LaTorre catching for the Triple-A Fresno Grizzlies on May 24, 2011.
Euros-Logo-2012 “We had one goal and that was to repeat as European champions,”
said LaTorre. “It was awesome. I’m definitely thankful to the Giants for letting me go.” The former University of California, Davis and Aptos High School All-Star catcher has spent seven years in the Giants organization for a chance to shine in the World Baseball Classic.

italy flag LaTorre’s Italian roots trace back to his great-grandparents in Italy. It took two and a half years for him to become eligible to play for Team Italy as a dual citizen and Italian passport holder after thorough research, documentation and tedious paperwork authenticating his Italian lineage. Adding his minor league experience plus the time served in Italian purgatory, Tyler LaTorre has waited nearly a decade to become Italy’s secret weapon in the WBC.Worth The Wait

Grilli is a BIG name in Italia and in Pittsburgh, PA

The Roberto Clemente Bridge leads Grilli and Pirates fans to PNC Park in downtown Pittsburgh.
The Roberto Clemente Bridge leads Grilli and Pirates fans to PNC Park in downtown Pittsburgh.
Italian Finance Minister Vittorio Grilli
Vittorio Grilli is currently
the Italian Finance Minister.
“I told the cab driver, just rolling up over the Clemente Bridge and going around the corner, I said, this is my office space,” said Pittsburgh’s new closer Jason Grilli after signing his two-year, $6.75 million contract through 2014 with the Pirates. “This is how I do my best work. There’s sometimes not enough money that can be a good tradeoff to being comfortable and to know what to expect.” Despite leaving money on the table and taking far less than the free agent market offered to stay in Pittsburgh–much to the disliking of Italian Finance Minister Vittorio Grilli, 36-year-old pitcher Jason Grilli remains a Pirate.
In his 2012 campaign for the Pittsburgh Pirates, reliever Jason Grilli established career highs in appearances (64) and strikeouts (90)
Jason Grilli established career highs in appearances (64) and strikeouts (90) with a career-best 2.91 ERA while holding opposing hitters to a .207 batting average in 2012.
ItaliaHowever, Jason Grilli has earned the right to pitch wherever he chooses after picking up the win in Team Italia’s 10-0 shutout of Australia in the 2006 World Baseball Classic (WBC) and a save in Italy’s 6-2 upset over heavily-favored Canada in the 2009 WBC competition. It goes without saying that the sight of Jason Grilli wearing an Azzurri jersey brings more joy and glory to the near-bankrupt European nation than any Italian politician could ever produce.
Jason Grilli pitching for Team Italia in the 2006 World Baseball Classic.
Jason Grilli pitching for Team Italia in the 2006 WBC.
Yet, politics somehow infiltrated into Italian baseball during the 1996 Olympics. After being invited by the the Italian Baseball Federation to join the country’s Olympic team while playing college ball at Seton Hall, Grilli stood proud and was honored with a parade in his hometown of Syracuse, New York. When joining the team with another Italian American pitcher, they did not receive a warm reception. The other players on the Italian squad that qualified for the Olympics without the two imports threatened a boycott.

italian_american_ Facing an ‘us or them’ ultimatum, the pitchers were dismissed. “I was in tears the whole way home,”
Grilli said. “The good part of it was I got to see Italy, but the worst part of it was it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and I didn’t get to play.” Grilli traces his family heritage roots to Florence and Naples. He said, “I’m 75 percent Italian. My last name is every bit as Italian as you can get. The name on the front of the jersey is always more important than the name on the back, but in this case, the two go hand-in-hand.
I wouldn’t have ‘Italia’ on the front if I didn’t have ‘Grilli’ on the back. Obviously, I love the United States. But I’m also proud of my lineage.”

Tommy Lasorda was honored in 2011 by the National Italian American Foundation when he was presented the NIAF Lifetime Achievement Award in Sports Management by Team Italia Coach and former Dodger Mike Piazza.
Tommy Lasorda was honored in 2011 by the National Italian American Foundation
when he was presented the NIAF Lifetime Achievement Award in Sports Management
by Team Italia Coach, 12-time MLB All-Star and former Dodger catcher Mike Piazza.
“You know, they say the more you hang around Italians, the more Italian you become,”
said Grilli. “And that’s what I am. I’m an Italian,” said the Italian right-hander (il Italiano adopera la mano destra) who reminisced about his experience playing for Team Italia in
the World Baseball Classic. “One day Tommy Lasorda came in to talk to us. It was one of
the greatest speeches I’d ever heard. I wish I’d memorized or recorded it. He talked about the pride that comes with being Italian, with such feeling. It was a great experience.”
Having been invited to attend the 28th Annual Italian Coach Convention in Parma, Italy, Grilli is seriously considering a coaching career in Italy after he retires from Major League Baseball. “I know (former MLB All-Star and Team Italia coach) Mike Piazza has a house
(in Italy), and he goes over for a couple months every year,” Grilli said. “It‘s intriguing.”
Grilli and Team Italia stand at attention during the playing of the Italian National Anthem before facing Venezuela in the 2009 WBC.
Grilli and Team Italia stand at attention during the playing of the Italian National Anthem before being eliminated by Venezuela in the 2009 World Baseball Classic at Rogers Centre.
Team Italian Major Leaguers Jason Grilli, Alex Liddi and Francisco Cervelli celebrate after Grill held Canada scoreless for three innings and picked up the save in the 2009 WBC in Toronto.
Team Italia Major Leaguers Jason Grilli, Alex Liddi and Francisco Cervelli celebrate after Grill held host Canada scoreless for three innings and picked up the save at the 2009 World Baseball Classic in Toronto.
Selected by the San Francisco Giants in the first round of the 1997 First-Year Player Draft (fourth pick overall), Grilli made his MLB debut with the Florida Marlins in 2000 and has made 330 career appearances during his 10 seasons in the big leagues. The Pirates signed Grilli as a free agent on July 21, 2011, and he has posted a 2.76 ERA with 127 strikeouts in 92 appearances over the last two seasons. He hinted at comfort and a heightened sense of excitement for Pittsburgh’s resurgence to Clemente-era dominance as top reasons for re-signing. “I’ve been on 10 different teams,” Grilli said. “The grass is never always greener. It’s really all the same. There’s just Piratessomething fitting here. It’s just a baseball town and it bugs me as much as it bugs everybody else in this city. They want this so bad.” In 2012 Grilli limited opponents to just one run in 15 of his 64 appearances and struck out at least one hitter in 56 of the 64 games. He set a franchise record for relievers by striking out at least one batter in each of his first 19 appearances in 2012. Although a bull in the pen on the mound, Jason is quite the gentlemen to members of the press. The local chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America recently voted Grilli as the winner of the Chuck Tanner Award–an award that recognizes the player who is most cooperative with the media.
Train lead singer Patrick Monahan shares a laugh with Pirates' closer Jason Grill.
Train lead singer Patrick Monahan shares a laugh with Pittsburgh Pirates’ closer Jason Grilli.
Roberto Clemente statue at PNC Park.
Roberto Clemente statue at PNC Park in Pittsburgh.
Jason Grilli wants to bring back the World Series glory days to Pittsburgh. As a proud Italian, he supports MLB’s initiative to foster baseball’s popularity in Italy through the Federazione Italiana Baseball Softball (FIBS)-sponsored MLB Italian Academy and international games like the World Baseball Classic. Grilli said, “I’m in the books in Italian baseball, and that’s good. Major League Baseball wants the game to grow globally, and I’m happy to be a part of that.”

Garth Brooks’ favorite Top 40 American in the ABL: #37 Chuck Lofgren of the Brisbane Bandits

37Prior to joining the Brisbane Bandits, the closest lefty pitcher Chuck Lofgren ever came to Australia was in 2010 when Aussie teammate Trent Oeltjen from the Nashville Sounds, Triple-A affiliate for the Milwaukee Brewers, introduced him to Vegemite. It was during this time period that the Wild Wild West California Country boy, who always wears boots on days that he pitches, got a chance to meet his idol Garth Brooks at the superstar’s Teammates for Kids Foundation Fundraiser at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville. Brooks later summoned Lofgren from his sixth row seat at the Country Music Hall of Fame’s Ford Theater to join the band onstage.

Chuck Lofgren singing with Garth Brooks and his band at the County Music Hall of Fame's Ford Theater in 2010.
Chuck Lofgren made his big league singing debut with Country legend Garth Brooks
and his band in Nashville after many years of playing in minor league cover bands.

American CowboyClick HERE to see his live performance. “Besides being drafted, that was the best thing I ever did,” said Lofgren, who plays a Seagull six-string guitar in a Country music cover band. “When you’re playing tiny mom and pop shops and dive bars, it’s a lot different than getting up there with him.” It’s been a long road for the former 2004 Cleveland Indians fourth round draft pick, who was heralded in the Baseball America 2006 Handbook “as one of the top lefthanders in the minors.” The Baseball America 2008 edition speculated that Lofgren “could make his big league debut later in the year.” However, his MLB debut eluded him after an extended stay at Triple-A Columbus did not warrant a call-up.

Chuck Lofgren in the 2008 Futures Game
Chuck Lofgren in the 2007 All-Star Futures Game
When the Cleveland Indians left Lofgren exposed in the Rule 5 draft, the Brewers claimed him in 2009. After a 2010 season-long Nashville audition, which included his unrehearsed performance with Garth Brooks at the Country Music Hall of Fame, Milwaukee set him free.
The South Bay native grew up watching his favorite player, Will “The Thrill” Clark, play at nearby Candlestick Park, and it was always a childhood dream to play for the San Francisco Giants. It was a family affair for Lofgren as his father was a 35-year veteran of the San Francisco Police Department and worked on-field security near the dugout during Giants games. He signed as a minor league free agent with the Giants’ organization in 2010. Lofgren pitched in 2011 at Single-A San Jose, Double-A Richmond and Triple-A Fresno–posting a 5-3 record with a 4.31 ERA, 1.45 WHIP, 6.8 K/9 rate, and 5.2 BB/9 rate. The Giants were looking for more from their local cowboy so Lofgren dug deep to his baseball roots when he was a successful two-way player and made the transition from lefty pitcher to first baseman and outfielder with his bat.
Brisbane Bandits pitcher Chuck Lofgren (Scott Powick / SMP Images)
Brisbane Bandits’ Chuck Lofgren in 2012 ABL action (Scott Powick / SMP Images)

As a teenager, he was named to the AFLAC All-American High School Baseball Classic in 2003 for his precise pitching and consistent hitting after three consecutive years as a two-way player for the USA Baseball team in Mexico (Gold Medal Winners), Venezuela and Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. When Lofgren was drafted by Cleveland in 2004, he was so good offensively that his contract allowed him to pitch and hit. Unfortunately, a home plate collision quickly ended his hitting career as the Tribe did not want their star pitching prospect getting hurt. Yet, after eight years of pitching in the minor leagues Lofgren was willing to lay it all on the line as a hitter for the San Francisco Giants when he re-signed as a minor league free agent for the 2012 season. If current free agent Rick Ankiel had successfully made the transition from pitcher to hitter in MLB, why couldn’t Lofgren do the same? The six-foot-four, 220 pounder was encouraged by the support of the Giants’ front office–especially Vice President Bobby Evans, who reportedly liked Lofgren’s swing and wanted to work with him.

Chuck Lofgren's baseball idol Will Clark
Childhood baseball idol Will Clark inspired Bay Area fan Chuck Lofgren to play for the San Francisco Giants.
The Giants had the lowest 2011 run total in the National League and as a result had little patience for Lofgren’s offensive transformation. On March 12th
San Francisco trimmed down its roster in preparation of 2012 Spring Training and had to part ways with
the once-heralded baseball prospect. In a classy response to his release, Chuck Lofgren (@chuckylof) tweeted: “Got released today by the Giants always thankful for the opportunity from the team that I grew up watching and loving. One door closes…” Although not a Major League Baseball club, American Association of Independent Professional Baseball’s Amarillo Sox happily opened the door for the multi-talented player. Since it is a rarity in baseball to find a starting pitcher who can serve as the team’s designated hitter on most pitching off days, Lofgren was a welcome addition to the 2012 Amarillo Sox roster. In his 200 at-bats, Lofgren compiled a .245 batting average with eight doubles, two triples, three homers, 32 walks and 25 RBI. Making 20 starts and working 119.2 innings, the veteran pitcher compiled a 4-6 record with a 4.36 ERA.

Chuck Lofgren's twitter photo
Chuck Lofgren’s (@chuckylof) twitter profile photo
2012-13 Brisbane Bandits pitcher Chuck Lofgren (4-3, 3.05 ERA) appears to have found his groove again playing in the Australian Baseball League. His most impressive
start on December 7th against the Perth Heat yielded 11 strikeouts
and was by far his best outing yet. Lofgren said, “Coming out you always want to face Perth. You hear that they’re the team to beat.” The 26-year-old American import went 6.2 innings and limited the reigning ABL champion Heat to just one earned run, seven hits and one walk. Lofgren may just have to sing Garth Brooks’ “Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)” again for MLB as a reminder that he still has a lot of game left in him despite being written-off prematurely.BrisbaneBandits

Giants’ Roberto Kelly manages Team Panama with fast track to World Baseball Classic in March 2013

Giants coach Roberto Kelly was very instrumental to
San Francisco’s 2010 and 2012 World Championships.
The San Francisco Giants have never been big in the larceny department. The 1986 team holds the franchise record with 148 stolen bases. After guiding Giants’ baserunners to a 67.5% success rate in swiping bags during his first four seasons, first base coach and baserunning instructor Roberto Kelly turned up the heat to 75% in 2012. Now as manager of host Panama in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier, Kelly hopes to parlay his World Championship magic to lead Panama’s best to a ticket to the WBC competition beginning March 7, 2013.
Roberto Kelly tries to calm down the emotionally-charged Angel Pagan, who led the 2012 Giants in triples and steals.
The 2012 Giants ranked tenth overall in MLB with 118 stolen bases, a vast improvement from last year’s 24th ranking and 85 steals. The team identified baserunning as an area that needed work this past season after their NL-low 2011 run total of 570. Led by outfielders Angel Pagan, Gregor Blanco, Hunter Pence and shortstop Brandon Crawford, instincts and speed made a difference when taking an extra base or advancing from first to third. Reflecting on winning the 2012 World Series and the sudden increase in offense, coach Kelly said: “First of all, we had the guys to do it with. Second, we had to score more runs.” Despite having a more mobile lineup than ever, third baseman Pablo Sandoval and catcher Buster Posey possessed less than optimal speed on base. “Obviously we’re not going to ask those guys to steal 20 bases,” Kelly said. “But they can get bigger leads and let the pitcher know they’re there. Getting a bigger lead’s going to allow you to have a better chance of going from first to third.”
Manager Bruce Bochy is delighted to have such a fine future MLB managerial candidate as Roberto Kelly.
Gregor Blanco saves Matt Cain’s perfect game with his leaping catch on June 13, 2012 and credits his coach Roberto Kelly for his defensive excellence.
San Francisco skipper Bruce Bochy recalled why the Giants recruited the two-time MLB All-Star and successful minor league manager Roberto Kelly in 2008. “The teams he managed had a lot of speed and used it well,” Bochy said. “He has a great way about him, he’s very professional, and he had a successful career in the big leagues. He’ll help the runners to read pitchers, work on their jumps, their secondary leads — all the things that help you take an extra base.” Kelly also has worked with Giants outfielders and helped them post a .989 fielding percentage–third-best in MLB since 2008. Gregor Blanco credits his aggressive outfield approach in making web gem catches throughout the season and his precise bunt stop mere inches fair on the infield dirt in the World Series to coach Kelly. Blanco said, “I was joking with Roberto Kelly when I got to first base. We practiced that. That was a perfect bunt.” When the Hall of Fame asked for the glove that saved Matt Cain’s perfect game, he obliged. Blanco said, “I’m happy to be able to accomplish that,
26-year-old MLB journeyman Luis Durango, who recently signed with the Kansas City Royals, will be Panama’s spark plug against Brazil, Colombia, and Nicaragua in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier.
and I’ll be able to see my glove in Cooperstown. It’s a great deal for me. That comes from hard work and working with the guys, with Angel Pagan, with Roberto Kelly. I have to give credit to them.” Coach Kelly also likes Pagan. “He’s a great talent and has been great for us on both sides of the field,” Kelly said. “He’s been fine for us and in control. He’s very aggressive.” Switch-hitting Luis Durango is Panama manager Roberto Kelly’s answer to Pagan. The speedy outfielder recently signed with the Kansas City Royals after hitting .289 with a .352 OBP and 46 steals for Triple-A Gwinnett Braves in 2012.
Clocked running from home plate to first base on a bunt in 3.4 seconds, Luis Durango replaced injured Michael Bourn on the 2011 Houston Astros roster.
Leadoff hitter Luis Durango was one
of the few bright spots in Panama’s two losses during the 2009 World Baseball Classic Pool D competition in San Juan, Puerto Rico. In game one against host Puerto Rico, Durango singled, walked twice and stole one base. In Panama’s follow-up contest
in which they were eliminated by the Dominican Republic, he went 2-for-3. Hitting .600 in the 2009 World Baseball Classic, Durango was second in the international games in batting average and on-base percentage. Panama’s 48-year-old manager will use Durango’s ability to get on base, steal a bag or two and ultimately score to win the 2012 WBC Qualifier games beginning November 15th at Panama City, Panama’s Rod Carew Stadium.
Roberto Kelly is very gracious with his time and sponsors many youth baseball clinics in Panama.
A positive role model for Panama’s next generation of MLB stars, Roberto Kelly is committed to the growth of baseball in his native homeland and is looking for ways to teach the youth about the game and life’s lessons. After enjoying a solid 14-year Major League playing career and compiling a lifetime .290 batting average with 241 doubles, 124 home runs, 585 RBI and 235 stolen bases over 1,337 games, Kelly is now a two-time World Champion MLB coach and manager of Panama’s national team. An inspiration for many on how hard work and dedication can bring success, Panama looks to Kelly
Roberto Kelly and Panama outfielder Rubén Rivera

to lead the country to greatness by advancing to the 2013 World Baseball Classic. He will not be alone in this special assignment as former MLB outfielder Rubén Rivera (1995-2003) will be there by his side every step of the way. Although his cousin–New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera–has never participated in the World Baseball Classic, Rubén will be making his third WBC appearance for Panama. Still playing ball and in excellent shape at age 39, Rubén is very much the heart and soul of this Panama squad.
Giants first base coach Roberto Kelly and 2012 World Series MVP Pablo “Panda” Sandoval
With over 3.5 million Panamanians cheering on their national baseball heroes in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier, there’s a good chance that the sense of excitement in Panama City will equal that of the recent enthusiasm at the 2012 World Series Champion Giants celebratory parade in the streets of downtown San Francisco. The common link to key both of these teams is Giant coach and Panama manager Roberto Kelly. With his expertise and his roster of very talented players, Panama is destined to party hard after a win of the
WBC Qualifier Final on November 19th.

Perth Heat add bite to lineup with Canadian import and Arizona Diamondbacks prospect Carter Bell

Like Sex and the City starlett Kim Cattrall, Carter Bell grew up in the small Vancouver Island, BC city of Courtenay. Opting out of the A-Rod spotlight method with the usual Hollywood fanfare and paparazzi, the 22-year-old Bell chose a lower profile means of pursuing his professional baseball career under the radar by playing for the Perth Heat in the Australian Baseball League.

Brewers’ Taylor Green made his MLB debut in 2012.
Following the same path as Milwaukee Brewers’ infielder Taylor Green, the six-foot-one Canadian third baseman played high school baseball for the Parksville Royals of the British Columbia Premier Baseball League. Upon graduation, Bell was a 22nd-round selection by the San Francisco Giants in the 2008 MLB First-Year Player Draft but did not sign in favor
of accepting a scholarship to play ball for the Oregon State Beavers.
Carter Bell (far right) and fellow 2010 OSU Beavers

MLB noticed Bell early on when he donned a Team Canada uniform for the first-time at age 17. Representing his country in far away competitions held in Mexico, Japan as well as on his home turf, the BC All-Star chose the 2006 and 2007 NCAA National Champ Oregon State University baseball program to further develop his craft. The decision was sound as he was selected in the 29th round of the 2011 MLB June Amateur Draft and signed by the Arizona Diamondbacks following his junior year at OSU.
Former Yakima Bear Carter Bell stands at attention during the playing of the national anthem.
Hitting .270 in 41 games with eight doubles, two triples, one home run and 17 RBI, Bell’s pro debut with the 2011 Single-A Short Season Yakima Bears catapulted him to Single-A Advanced Visalia Rawhide in 2012. In Cal League play, he batted .259 in 81 games with 11 doubles, one triple, four home runs and 36 RBI. The road leading Down Under to the Perth Heat originated back in Oregon, where Bell played for former Perth Heat manager and long-standing Corvallis Knights skipper Brooke Knight after his first year at OSU. In his limited 10 games of 2009 West Coast League action, Bell hit .303 (10-33) with three RBI before suffering a season-ending concussion.
Former Perth Heat Manager Brooke Knight led his team to two ABL Championships.
MLB veteran and OSU All-Star Mike Thurman, a scout for the New York Yankees, was first to notice of Carter Bell’s athleticism.
Brooke Knight credits his best friend since his college days in playing ball together at Oregon State University, Mike Thurman, for pointing him in right direction just north of the border to find the Victoria-born Carter Bell, who rapidly rose to prominence in the Comox Valley Baseball Association and BC Premier Baseball League before playing as a teenager for Team Canada. Speaking on the eve before departing to Australia to assist new Perth Heat skipper Steve Fish in preparing the reigning Australian Champions for next month’s Asia Series against its foreign counterparts from Japan, Taiwan, China and South Korea, Knight explained how Canadian import Carter Bell landed Down Under: “To his credit, Carter took the initiative to call me and express his initial desire to play for the Perth Heat. He still considers it a privilege to take on this challenge. I told him it was the perfect winter league for him to get his body ready for spring because the ABL offers something that cannot be found anywhere else. The atmosphere and structure keeps players healthy because the league emphasizes safety first by limiting play to four games a week, which allows you to rest your body and properly heal.”

Knight also read Bell the disclaimer and warned him of the Aussie side effects: “I told him that Australia was culturally different as well and when it gets hot in December one can get homesick real fast and start crying out for girlfriends.” Knight feels blessed to have had the opportunity to coach such fine players as Carter Bell in Perth and Corvallis. “With guidance, I have luckily ended up with the right kids. Carter is a solid player. I’m just waiting for him to breakout. He’s got gap power and can hit the ball well the other way (to the opposite field). His power numbers will bump up as they did for import Adam Melker, a St. Louis Cardinals prospect.” Adam was Carter’s teammate on Brooke Knight’s 2009 Corvallis Knights. They will reunite under Knight’s leadership on the Perth Heat in the upcoming 2012 Asia Series on November 8-11 in Busan, South Korea. Melker hit 10 home runs for Double-A Springfield in 2012 as compared to none in 2011. Knight believes in Carter Bell. “He’s got a chance to make a difference. Carter has good range and can play the corners, not to mention he’s a Team Canada All-Star Shortstop.”

After impressing many in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization while playing for Single-A Advanced Visalia Rawhide in 2012, prospect Carter Bell will parlay his aggressive play for
the Australian Baseball League’s Perth Heat. (Photo by Ken Weisenberger/Strike3Photos.com)

MLB veteran and Padres Double-A pitching coach Tim Worrell likes Hayden Beard’s competitiveness

With 14 years of Major League Baseball pitching experience under his belt, it was a no brainer for San Diego’s AA affiliate in San Antonio to call on Tim Worrell to fill the shoes of former Missions’ pitching coach Jimmy Jones, who was summoned to become the new Padres bullpen. Hired by the parent-club San Diego Padres in 2010, Worrell had been working in Peoria, Arizona with the organization’s players in extended spring training and on rehab assignment prior to reporting to the Texas League team. Having to leave his wife and six boys back home in Phoenix to take on pitching coach duties in San Antonio, it wouldn’t be long before Worrell would be adopted by his new baseball family of international pitchers led by Aussie Hayden Beard.

San Diego prospect Hayden Beard
Hayden “Big Dog” Beard came off a strong 2011 campaign after pitching for Team Australia during
the Baseball World Cup in Panama as well as for
the Australian Baseball League’s Canberra Cavalry. During the 2011-12 Cavalry season, he earned himself ABL Player of the Week honours and a team-leading five wins with a 2.82 ERA. Heading into 2012 Padres Spring Training Camp, Beard looked radiant and as confident as ever. After leading High-A Lake Elsinore Storm to a 2011 Cal League Championship, it was natural for the right-handed hurler to saddle up for a promotion to Double-A San Antonio Missions. Although there were a few bumps in the road during the seemingly rough ride, the Aussie pitcher finished strong with a 6-5 record in just over 119 innings of work. Starting in 19 games, Beard gave his team a chance to win every outing. However, he relished after the All-Star break in his 12 bullpen appearances during which his strikeout totals accelerated to 69.

We caught up with family man Tim Worrell in the San Antonio Missions’ dugout recently and discussed how Padres pitching prospect Hayden Beard’s best years may have yet to come.

Roberto: 27-year-old Aussie pitcher Hayden Beard is a late bloomer because he had to sit out for three years due to nerve damage in his arm. The Padres obviously have faith in him by sending him your way in Double-A San Antonio. Having said that you reached the prime of your career at age 31, do you see some parallels between the two of you in showing him that there is light at the end of the tunnel?

Tim Worrell: Yeah, sure. Again, I never try to tell these guys where their careers could finish at. I’d be a dummy to tell them that. First off, he’s got a great live arm and great movement on his pitches. Sometimes he struggles a little bit with control and that obviously puts us in trouble. When we’re behind in the count regularly, it puts the hitters in hitter’s counts. But he’s definitely starting to get some of these approaches knowing that is an area he needs to work on. And that in itself ends up helping to control some of the results that end up happening to us. (You) can’t always control them all, but it does put us in a better position. And he is still working on fine-tuning his game. It wasn’t long ago that we sped him up a little quicker to the plate without giving up quality of stuff so that he could hold runners on first better. So there are definitely physical things we need to do and he needs to do to make his game better. But a lot of it is just believing and trusting his stuff.

Roberto: Watching his roommate Miles Mikolas get the call-up to the Padres, rubbing shoulders with last year’s surprise in the San Diego bullpen, Erik Hamren, and this year’s sensation, Nick Vincent, must have been inspirational for Hayden with the realization that he could be next. Having watched him pitch in Australia and in Lake Elsinore, the fact remains is that Hayden Beard is a great competitor. Now that he is paired up with you in San Antonio, I think it’s an awesome combination. I’m really happy that you guys are really able to work together in developing his craft.

Tim Worrell: Yep. And you brought up probably his number one attribute and that’s his competitiveness, which is probably the most important thing. Because a true competitor never gives in. We have to remind ourselves at times maybe that we are that. But they don’t give in, and they are always looking to get better and always looking to get the job done.

Hayden Beard pitches during the MLB offseason for his hometown Canberra Cavalry.

Perth’s Corey Adamson following Aussie Baseball Hall of Fame father’s lead excites Padres’ faithful

Perth Heat outfielder and San Diego Padres prospect Corey Adamson is currently playing for the Single-A affiliate Fort Wayne TinCaps. (Photo courtesy of the ABL / SMP Images)
Although the most prominent Australian baseball family may be the Nilsson’s, Aussie Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Adamson and his 20-year-old son, San Diego Padres prospect Corey Jon Adamson, may soon rewrite history. During his illustrious career from 1989-1995 for the Perth Heat, the elder Adamson made the most of his 279 appearances by putting up some very impressive numbers: .316 batting average, .606 slugging percentage, 252 RBI and 71 home runs. One tough act to follow as a 1988 Olympian and a Claxton Shield Helms Award Winner, Australian Baseball League star slugger Tony Adamson is undeniably one of Western Australia’s greatest baseball players ever. If anyone can surpass Tony’s huge accomplishments and break into Major League Baseball, it will be his son Corey–who is highly touted as one of the finest five-tool players with plus speed to come out of Australia.
Perth's Corey Adamson wears #1 for a reason. (Photo courtesy of Ben Southall/SMP Images)
Aussie San Diego Padres pitching prospect and rival Canberra Cavalry pitcher "The Big Dog" Hayden Beard believes he and Corey are MLB bound.
“The Big Dog” Hayden Beard, fellow Aussie Padres prospect and rival Canberra Cavalry pitcher, fetched Corey to our interview location last month during Padres Spring Training camp in Peoria, Arizona.
Seven years his senior and a starter for the Double-A affiliate San Antonio Missions, Beard has assumed a sort of mentoring role to Adamson. However, they operate together like Abbott and Costello. “Beardy”, as Adamson affectionately calls him, politely exercised good doggy manners by allowing Corey to take the mike before him because Adamson had to leave first for a minor league exhibition game against the Texas Rangers. However, there was a price to be paid for this courtesy as “The Big Dog” barked out some very witty answers to questions directed to Adamson. Corey often rifled back with even funnier responses. Although the two competed against one another in the Australian Baseball League, it was clear that they truly were MLB teammates with the same dream to make it all the way to San Diego’s PETCO Park.

20-year-old Corey Adamson is one of the Padres' finest work-in-progress.

Roberto: How are things at Padres Spring Training?
Corey Adamson: Feeling really good. This is my third spring training. I signed when I was 16. Came over for a couple weeks when I was 17. Then when
I was 18, 19, and now 20 for my third full season.
Roberto: Life in San Diego is the closest thing to West Coast living in Perth. How is it being a Padre?
Corey Adamson: It’s really good. When I signed
and I went to San Diego, I thought it was like Perth in Western Australia. I really liked the whole atmosphere of it.
Roberto: Congratulations to you and the Perth Heat for back-to-back ABL Championships. Describe your amazing catch seen by millions on TV worldwide.
Corey Adamson: It was really good winning the whole thing with Perth, which was great because we had did it the year before and made it even better. But the catch, Justin Huber, a power-hitter pulled one down the line. I saw it in the air and then I lost it. So I was kind of running blindly to the fence and then picked it up at the last minute. I had to make the slide and cut up my knee and busted it on the fence unfortunately. Other than that it looked cool on TV…I guess (laughter). The response was huge.
As soon as I caught the ball, you could hear the whole place going up and then what you didn’t see in the video is all the pitchers in the bullpen that were going crazy as well and just everyone down the line. It was really cool!

Corey Adamson (standing front and center) celebrates Perth Heat's 2012 ABL Championship victory over the Melbourne Aces. (Photo courtesy of Bohdan Warchomij / Metaphor Images)

After pitching against the Perth Heat in the ABL Championship Series, Melbource Ace pitcher Travis Blackley headed to Giants Spring Training camp in Arizona to prepare for his return to MLB with San Francisco.
Roberto: Was Perth overconfident in the ABL Championship against the Melbourne Aces?
Corey Adamson: The Perth Heat as a team…we’re not the most serious team. We go out.
We have fun and stuff. The Melbourne Aces
are a really good team. They came out and threw their best pitchers. We threw our best guys, and hit for hit we were going with each other. We just had to come through, and we took it in the end. I don’t think we came in too cocky about it, but we came in with confidence like we do with every other series.
Roberto: Did it appear that Melbourne Ace pitcher Travis Blackley was out there to make amends and stop the Heat from repeating?
Corey Adamson: He wasn’t out there just to pitch for himself. He wanted to win. You could see it when he gave up a hit. He was getting angry if he didn’t strike someone out. Or if he gave up a walk he was getting mad about it.
He was out there competing, and I guess we just came through in the end.

Perth Heat's Luke Hughes
Roberto: Did you think that the Perth Heat were vulnerable when Aussie MLB star Luke Hughes got hurt and was not able to play on your team in the ABL Championship?
Corey Adamson: As good as it is having Luke Hughes in the line-up, we felt like we had enough depth in the line-up that we put out there. Not that we didn’t need him, but that we could get by without him–which was good. We still hung his jersey in the dugout. A little bit of good luck so it felt like he was there.
Corey Adamson poses for a 2011 San Diego Padres publicity photo.
Corey Adamson received instruction
from legendary MLB All-Star Rod Carew at the famed MLB Australian Academy.
Roberto: You’re always smiling in a Padres uniform. What’s the secret to your happiness?
Corey Adamson: It’s a great organization, a great place to be in. Even in spring training, it’s like all the coaches care about what you’re doing. All the managers care..it’s not we’re here just for
a business. You know even though it’s a business, it’s more like a family as well. I got to keep hitting well. Wherever they put me, I will play as best I can. I just got to keep working. Go well this spring, this season. And then in the offseason again–just keep getting better. Hopefully, it will be a short trip to the Big Leagues.
Roberto: Who do you aspire to be like in Major League Baseball?
Hayden Beard (interjecting): The Big Dog! (laughter)
Corey Adamson: Definitely not like Beardy at all!!! (even more laughter)
Former Perth U.S. Consul General Ken Chern (center) with Dave Nilsson (left) and Graeme Lloyd (right).
Roberto: How about the MLB players and instructors at the MLB Australian Academy?
Corey Adamson: Through Academy and having Dave Nilsson coach and Graeme Lloyd…that was great. Dave Nilsson was a really good coach. He taught me a lot of stuff and to always aim to be an all-star. One year we
had Rod Carew as our baserunning and outfield coach. I loved the way
he played. He had 18 years of all-star appearances and a bunch of stolen bases. I just loved the way he played the game.

The intensity of Corey Adamson is much appreciated by jubilant teammate Matt Kennelly in
the ABL Championship against Melbourne. (Photo courtesy of Theron Kirkman / SMP Images)
Roberto: Do you feel coming from an emerging baseball market in Australia that you are at a disadvantage competing against players from countries which historically have had success in launching long and lucrative careers in MLB?
Corey Adamson: Coming over from Australia you can really tell that we haven’t had as many swings and reps as the Latin American or American guys. But it just means is that when we get here that we have to try extra hard to play catch up a little bit. And just really knuckle down on focusing what the coaches are telling us to do, exactly what they say.

By working out in the weight room with Padre Kyle Blanks--a six-foot-six, 270 pound muscleman--Corey Adamson hopes to fast track to MLB.
Roberto: What is your interaction with the Padres Major Leaguers like Kyle Blanks?
Corey Adamson: The locker rooms are kind of
split up, but we’re always intertwined at some point whether getting lunch or in the weight room and stuff. I always try to have a couple words with him.
I speak to Blanks a lot whenever he’s walking by or whatever.
Roberto: The guy is a giant! I don’t think I’ve ever seen anybody his stature. What is he, six-foot-six
and 270 pounds?
Corey Adamson: He’s huge. As much as I would like, I don’t think that I’ll ever be able to take the BP(batting practice) that he can take.
Roberto: Are you giving way to him when he wants to use the bench press and you’re next in line?
Corey Adamson: Ah, you know, I think I might be able to push a little more weight than him.
Hayden Beard: (uncontrollable outburst of laughter)
Corey Adamson: He’s a Big Leaguer so he gets first pick of what he would like to do, and I I’ll just do something else.
After leading the Australian Baseball League in hits (67), runs (41), BB (34), BA (.409), OBP (.510), and OPS (1.187), and not being named the ABL MVP, we hereby award Brian Burgamy of the Canberra Cavalry a life-size Carmen Electra Easter bunny booby prize for his earth-shattering 2011-12.

Roberto: What inspired you @coreyadamson to tweet about Easter eggs and Easter bunnies?
Corey Adamson: (Laughter) Me and Beardy went to Walmart to do our taxes one day, and the bloke that did our taxes was just drunk, smashed out of his head. He was really below average at his job so we walked around Walmart for a little bit. Saw that Easter eggs were out, and so we got to have a
couple Easter eggs.
Roberto: If any team was going to take down
the Perth Heat, yet did not qualify for the playoffs but appeared to have shut down your offense throughout the season with their pitching, it was
the Canberra Cavalry. Did they not have the Perth Heat’s number?
Corey Adamson: Yeah, you could say that. They had a really good pitching staff. You know, being
2-for-2 off Hayden Beard was pretty good.
Hayden Beard: (Laughter) Two bloopers.
Corey Adamson: (Laughter) Two first-pitch leanies at his face.
Hayden Beard: (Laughter)
Corey Adamson: Yeah, they (Canberra) were the team to take us down if anyone could.
Roberto: What about Brian Burgamy not getting
the Australian Baseball League Most Valuable Player?
Brian Burgamy came up short in ABL MVP voting.(Photo courtesy of ABL / Ben Southall / SMP Images)
Hayden Beard::((Shaking his head in disbelief)
I know…
Corey Adamson: You know, a .409 batting average
obviously deserves something. But I’m not going to
be the one to take it away from Tim Kennelly. (laughter)
Roberto: Maybe an Easter bunny would be a consolation gift? (laughter)
Corey Adamson: I’ll send one over to him. (laughter)
Roberto: Anything to share with your friends, families, coaches and supporters back home that have great hopes and aspirations for you?
Corey Adamson: Just that you know I’m over here grinding out everyday doing as best as I can to try to get to the Big Leagues as soon as possible. That’s
about it.
Roberto: Thank you for your time. It has been a pleasure visiting with you, and we’ll catch up with you again soon.
Corey Adamson: Thank you very much!
From the West Coast of Australia to the West Coast of California, six-foot-two, 185 pound
Perth Heat outfielder Corey Adamson will head for the expressway leading to his MLB debut
at San Diego's legendary PETCO Park. (Photo courtesy of ABL/Theron Kirkman/SMP Images)

#48 is for Sandoval, Hunter, Hirsh & MLBblogger!!!!

Launched in mid-October to patrol the 2011 Taiwan MLB All-Star Series and the Australian Baseball League, MLBblogger was ranked #48 in the 2011 Top 100 MLB.com Blogs after registering at #10 in November totals and giving others a 42 week head start. We would like to thank Major League Baseball, Minor League Baseball, the Australian Baseball League, our readers, and family members who have supported our international 24/7 baseball coverage in 2011. As a token of our appreciation, we have dedicated our first official post for 2012 to those special players who share the #48 jersey–including San Francisco Giant infielder Pablo Sandoval AKA Kung Fu Panda, Los Angeles Angel of Anaheim outfielder Torii Hunter and Melbourne Ace pitcher Jason Hirsh. Read on and learn about the mystery behind the #48.

The Zen of #48 Kung Fu Panda Pablo Sandoval of the 2010 World Champion San Francisco Giants
Major League Baseball is played in the U.S.A.’s 48 contiguous states and Canada. It is reported that Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, sat under a bo tree for 48 days attempting to figure out life, which developed into a type of spirit of the mind called Buddhism and its resulting expressions called Zen. There is a strong connection between Zen and baseball in Japan as the game developed there during a period of isolationism when nothing else was going on. Exported to America in 1873 by an English teacher named Horace Wilson, who taught at the University of Tokyo, baseball was in its purest form then with much emphasis on its pageantry and symmetry of the perfect diamond shape playing field. During times of drought in ancient times, the baseball fields were made up mostly of sand. Each base represented one of Japan’s islands, and players ran from base-to-base for refuge. The fields were raked before and after each game with different patterns in the sand so that the ball traveled in specific strategic directions once hit.
2011 Roberto Clemente Award nominee LA Angel of Anaheim #48 Torii Hunter is in Nirvana with the protection of Albert Pujols.

After the game took on a more competitive edge and the detailed sand patterns were a thing of the past, many retired ball players became gardeners and specialized in sand gardens, which provided a meditation spot for baseball memories. One can see the real life relationship between Zen and baseball practice where skill is perfected. The act of practicing repeatedly until the point of satisfaction is of utmost importance. A player faces an uphill battle in his difficult task and must remain Zen-like focused despite day-to-day adversity. Practice portrays a vision of life filled with the joy and happiness of baseball success. Yet, if one suffers a setback or injury in the process, there is always hope of a better tomorrow.
Life is a struggle, but we will never give in. Through personal persistence and cooperation from others, one’s dreams need not be compromised as all things are possible.

MLB veteran and current ABL Melbourne Ace pitcher #48 Jason Hirsh is making a comeback and is due for some good Karma in 2012.

Former MLB pitcher and current ABL Melbourne Ace Jason Hirsh is living proof that better must come one day. Now rehabbing after major shoulder surgery, which put him on the shelf for entire 2011 season, he shares with the world the aches and pains of a player’s battle to return into peak pitching form by writing an eloquent blog On My Way Back Up Down Under. Since coming back from surgery, the 29-year-old Southern California native has been pitching well for the Aces and has tallied two wins in seven starts. A seasoned pro with the Houston Astros, Colorado Rockies and New York Yankees organizations, Hirsh is a mentor and an inspiration for aspiring players in the ABL hoping to join the game’s elite.