Top 40 Americans in the ABL: #34 Chris Motta of the Canberra Cavalry

34 Growing up a hometown Bronx bomber fan and idolizing Yankee Derek Jeter, 22-year-old Concordia College grad Chris Motta never pictured himself pitching professionally in the Australian Baseball League. However, a twist of fate for this six-foot-two converted right-handed pitcher while training in Florida led the former catcher to the starting rotation for the Canberra Cavalry.

Catcher-turned-pitcher Chris Motta of the Canberra Cavalry (Colleen Petch / Canberra Times)
Catcher-turned-pitcher Chris Motta of the Canberra Cavalry (Colleen Petch / Canberra Times)
After volunteering to pitch so that the regular but weary Concordia Clippers‘ arms could get some rest, Motta was spotted on the mound by a visiting scout–who suggested he abandon his everyday catching duty in favor of pitching on the hill permanently. A two-way player at Concordia, Motta transitioned to a full-time pitcher during his final two years of college. Taking the scout’s advice to heart and leaving the comforts of mother’s home cooking, he headed south to Jack Russell Stadium in Clearwater, Florida–former home to Philadelphia Phillies Spring Training and current Probound USA Baseball training headquarters–to work religiously on pitching and develop into a hard-throwing prospect. Former Cavalry manager Steve Schrenk couldn’t help but notice Motta’s mid-90’s fastball, excellent mechanics and control. Although Schrenk did not return to Canberra this season as the manager, he played an integral part in the recruitment of valuable imports this season. Motta met with Schrenk, who encouraged the New Yorker to head to Australia to play for the Cavalry so that he could get the exposure necessary to take his pitching to the next level professionally.
Chris Motta in ABL action for the Canberry Cavalry ( Ben Southall / SMP Images)
Chris Motta in the ABL (Ben Southall/SMP Images)
PowerLogoThe young and versatile athlete spent the 2011 summer switching off between catcher and relief pitcher for the the Niagara Power, a faith-based baseball team affiliate of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes with a 40-game schedule that includes competing in the New York Collegiate Baseball League–one of the best summer wood bat leagues in the U.S.–as well as playing against other top-ranked collegiate teams. The hard work is paying off for Motta in the Australian Baseball League as his 3-3 record, 5.83 ERA and 34 strikeouts in his 57.2 innings pitched for the Canberra Cavalry speaks volumes about his true potential. In each of the American’s 12 starts, he has progressively become more dominant.
Chris Motta pitching against New Zealand Diamondblacks (Ben Southall/SMP Images)
Chris Motta facing the World Baseball Classic Qualifier-bound New Zealand Diamondblacks on November 9, 2012 (Ben Southall/SMP Images)
Mama Motta's Lobster Ravioli
“Gotta Hava” Lobster Ravioli is Chris Motta’s favorite.
Schrenk’s recommendation of adding “Gotta Hava” Motta to his list of recruits was a sound move, and the Cavalry have since catapulted to top of the ABL standings as a result. An added bonus to the Canberra roster, Motta’s mother will add her culinary flair to the already delectable lineup of talent when she joins her son and his teammates in Australia to cheer on the Cavalry down the stretch in 2013. With the injection of his favorite homemade dishes brought into the mix, the best of Chris Motta and his mom’s world-class cooking will undoubtedly arouse the senses of MLB scouts savvy enough to scoop up this irresistable combo while the servings to the dish are hot and the free agent is available.
Chris Motta being introduced prior to taking the field on December 22, 2012.  (Ben Southall/SMP Images)
Chris Motta prior to taking the field on December 22, 2012. (Ben Southall / SMP Images)

Top 40 Americans in the ABL: #35 Gabriel Suarez of the Adelaide Bite and 2013 WBC Qualifier Spain

35SuarezMinor league journeyman Gabriel Suarez, whose grandfather was of Spanish descent, was one of the reasons why Spain won the recent 2012 World Baseball Classic Qualifier in Jupiter, Florida to move on to the 2013 WBC in March. Going 6-for-12 with a .667 slugging percentage and .647 on-base percentage during the four-game tournament, Suarez was a pleasant surprise for underdog España.Adelaide_Bite

Selected by the Montreal Expos in the 26th round of the 2004 MLB June Amateur Draft out of Phoenix’s South Mountain Community College, the Denver-born Gabriel Suarez has played in the minor leagues with stints in the independent and international baseball leagues since turning pro. The 28-year-old Adelaide Bite outfielder has played every position but catcher in his career.

Adelaide Bite's Gabriel Suarez (Ryan Schembri / SMP Images)
28-year-old Gabriel Suarez brings invaluable pro ball experience to Adelaide.(Ryan Schembri/SMP Images)
Debuting in the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals farm system in 2004-05, Suarez has been affiliated with the Baltimore Orioles (2006), Colorado Rockies (2006), Cincinnati Reds (2006-07), Pittsburgh Pirates (2007-08), San Francisco Giants (2009), Houston Astros (2009), Philadelphia Phillies (2010) and Los Angeles Dodgers (2012). Before being signed by the Dodgers organization in July, Suarez played in the Mexican Leagues for Vaqueros Laguna and Delfines de Ciudad del Carmen as well as in the Independent Freedom League for the Montezuma Federals. Prior to making his way to the Australian Baseball League, the free agent spent time with Dodgers Single-A affiliates Great Lakes and Rancho Cucamonga.

Gabriel Suarez of the Adelaide Bite
Gabriel Suarez of the Adelaide Bite
The well-traveled utility player has twice found
his way back into the minor leagues by way of independent league baseball. Currently playing
for the 2012-13 Adelaide Bite, Suarez has put together a .235 batting average with one double, four RBI and one stolen base. At the completion of his Aussie baseball expedition in the ABL, Suarez will be focused on the World Baseball Classic. After winning the WBC Qualifier in Florida to advance to the 2013 World Baseball Classic, Spain’s second baseman Gabriel Suarez was already thinking about what was next. “We’re looking forward,” said Suarez. “Dream come true. We came here for this.” Spain overcame the odds with little time to prepare and beat a talented Israel team in the WBC Qualifier Final to earn the right to play against Pool C host Puerto Rico along with powerhouses Venezuela and Dominican Republic in San Juan beginning March 7, 2013.

Spain players celebrate their 9-7 win after 10 innings against Israel in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier Final in Jupiter, Florida on 9/23/12. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
Gabriel Suarez and his Spain teammates celebrate their 9-7 win in extra innings against Israel in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier Final in Jupiter, Florida on 9/23/12. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Australian lifestyle suits Top 40 American in the ABL: #36 Kevin Reese of the Melbourne Aces

36Ace pitcher Kevin Reese, who will on his home away from home turf as part of the World Team pitching staff in the 2012 ABL
All-Star Game at Melbourne Ballpark, would probably not think twice about crediting the Aussie lifestyle for his recently rejuvenated confidence and positive outlook. “I have to pay tribute to the Australian lifestyle, where everybody is very laid back,” Reese said.
“The biggest thing I learned out here was to trust your ability because you’re always one pitch away. There was a relaxed mindset
with runners on base. It’s nothing new that the coaches haven’t told me. It just kind of clicked. The lifestyle rolled into baseball.”Melbourne_Aces

After being named to the 2010 Frontier League All-Star Team pitching for the Traverse City Beach Bums and blowing away opponents in the Baseball Victoria Summer League as the Malvern Braves’ import, the 27-year-old right-hander earned the right to be the 2011 Melbourne Aces’ Opening Day starter. Asked to return for an encore and pitch during the 2012-13 ABL season, the Pennsylvania native is a lot better than his 2-5 record and 3.81 ERA reflects.

Top 40 American and Melbourne Ace pitcher Kevin Reese (Ryan Schembri / SMP Images)
2012 ABL All-Star and Melbourne Ace starting pitcher Kevin Reese (Ryan Schembri / SMP Images / ABL)

Currently ninth in the ABL with 51 strikeouts during his 59 innings of work and 11 starts, Reese is highly regarded by Melbourne Ace manager Phil Dale. Following an unlucky loss to the Canberra Cavalry on December 13th, Dale said: “He still gave us a chance, it was a quality start and from him that is all we can ask for.” The six-foot pitcher was one of 11 members of the Melbourne Aces chosen for 2012 ABL All-Star game. Reese suited up for the World All-Stars–which included players from the United States, Korea and Japan–and faced Team Australia.ABL All-Star Game The former East Stroudsburg South High School, Blair Academy and Lafayette College standout played for the Atlantic League’s Somerset Patriots in 2011 and the Camden Riversharks in 2012. Notable Riversharks in the ABL have included Mike McGuire and Brian Burgamy from the 2011-12 Canberra Cavalry and Sean Jarrett from 2011-12 Brisbane Bandits. Click HERE to see Reese, McGuire, Burgamy and Jarrett talk about their Aussie experience in this video produced by Alexis Brudnicki (@baseballalexis). Reese filled every role in the Camden Riversharks pitching staff. He started out in the long relief role, helping to save the bullpen when starters couldn’t go deep into ball games. Later he was added to the rotation, allowing the starters an extra day of rest with six men in the rotation. Then after he was put back into the bullpen, Reese was immediately called on to fill Sean Jarrett’s spot in the rotation when he went on the disabled list and proved to be invaluable for the remainder of the season.

Liam Bedford, Elliott Biddle and Kevin Reese of the Melbourne Aces (Brett Crockford / SMP Images)
Liam Bedford, Elliot Biddle and Kevin Reese of the Melbourne Aces (Brett Crockford / SMP Images / ABL)

Perhaps Reese’s best Melbourne Ace pitching moment came in possible elimination game
two of the best-of-three 2012 ABL Championship Series against the Perth Heat on February 11th. Entering the do-or-die game in the 11th inning with the score tied at 2-2, the American hurler tossed three scoreless innings to get the victory as the Aces scored the winning run in the top of the 13th to force a game three contest. Unfortunately, Melbourne came up short 7-6 and lost to the defending champion Heat in the series’ deciding game on the following day. This season the Aces hope to turn the tables and bring home the ABL championship to Victoria. There is a feeling in Australia that the best has yet to come for Kevin Reese, and he will come through in the clutch again when everything is on the line
for the 2012-13 Melbourne Aces.

Melbourne Aces' USA imports Kevin Reese and Bubbie Buzachero (Brett Crockford / SMP Images / ABL)
Melbourne Aces’ USA imports Kevin Reese and Bubbie Buzzachero (Brett Crockford / SMP Images / ABL)

Garth Brooks’ favorite Top 40 American in the ABL: #37 Chuck Lofgren of the Brisbane Bandits

37Prior to joining the Brisbane Bandits, the closest lefty pitcher Chuck Lofgren ever came to Australia was in 2010 when Aussie teammate Trent Oeltjen from the Nashville Sounds, Triple-A affiliate for the Milwaukee Brewers, introduced him to Vegemite. It was during this time period that the Wild Wild West California Country boy, who always wears boots on days that he pitches, got a chance to meet his idol Garth Brooks at the superstar’s Teammates for Kids Foundation Fundraiser at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville. Brooks later summoned Lofgren from his sixth row seat at the Country Music Hall of Fame’s Ford Theater to join the band onstage.

Chuck Lofgren singing with Garth Brooks and his band at the County Music Hall of Fame's Ford Theater in 2010.
Chuck Lofgren made his big league singing debut with Country legend Garth Brooks
and his band in Nashville after many years of playing in minor league cover bands.

American CowboyClick HERE to see his live performance. “Besides being drafted, that was the best thing I ever did,” said Lofgren, who plays a Seagull six-string guitar in a Country music cover band. “When you’re playing tiny mom and pop shops and dive bars, it’s a lot different than getting up there with him.” It’s been a long road for the former 2004 Cleveland Indians fourth round draft pick, who was heralded in the Baseball America 2006 Handbook “as one of the top lefthanders in the minors.” The Baseball America 2008 edition speculated that Lofgren “could make his big league debut later in the year.” However, his MLB debut eluded him after an extended stay at Triple-A Columbus did not warrant a call-up.

Chuck Lofgren in the 2008 Futures Game
Chuck Lofgren in the 2007 All-Star Futures Game
When the Cleveland Indians left Lofgren exposed in the Rule 5 draft, the Brewers claimed him in 2009. After a 2010 season-long Nashville audition, which included his unrehearsed performance with Garth Brooks at the Country Music Hall of Fame, Milwaukee set him free.
The South Bay native grew up watching his favorite player, Will “The Thrill” Clark, play at nearby Candlestick Park, and it was always a childhood dream to play for the San Francisco Giants. It was a family affair for Lofgren as his father was a 35-year veteran of the San Francisco Police Department and worked on-field security near the dugout during Giants games. He signed as a minor league free agent with the Giants’ organization in 2010. Lofgren pitched in 2011 at Single-A San Jose, Double-A Richmond and Triple-A Fresno–posting a 5-3 record with a 4.31 ERA, 1.45 WHIP, 6.8 K/9 rate, and 5.2 BB/9 rate. The Giants were looking for more from their local cowboy so Lofgren dug deep to his baseball roots when he was a successful two-way player and made the transition from lefty pitcher to first baseman and outfielder with his bat.
Brisbane Bandits pitcher Chuck Lofgren (Scott Powick / SMP Images)
Brisbane Bandits’ Chuck Lofgren in 2012 ABL action (Scott Powick / SMP Images)

As a teenager, he was named to the AFLAC All-American High School Baseball Classic in 2003 for his precise pitching and consistent hitting after three consecutive years as a two-way player for the USA Baseball team in Mexico (Gold Medal Winners), Venezuela and Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. When Lofgren was drafted by Cleveland in 2004, he was so good offensively that his contract allowed him to pitch and hit. Unfortunately, a home plate collision quickly ended his hitting career as the Tribe did not want their star pitching prospect getting hurt. Yet, after eight years of pitching in the minor leagues Lofgren was willing to lay it all on the line as a hitter for the San Francisco Giants when he re-signed as a minor league free agent for the 2012 season. If current free agent Rick Ankiel had successfully made the transition from pitcher to hitter in MLB, why couldn’t Lofgren do the same? The six-foot-four, 220 pounder was encouraged by the support of the Giants’ front office–especially Vice President Bobby Evans, who reportedly liked Lofgren’s swing and wanted to work with him.

Chuck Lofgren's baseball idol Will Clark
Childhood baseball idol Will Clark inspired Bay Area fan Chuck Lofgren to play for the San Francisco Giants.
The Giants had the lowest 2011 run total in the National League and as a result had little patience for Lofgren’s offensive transformation. On March 12th
San Francisco trimmed down its roster in preparation of 2012 Spring Training and had to part ways with
the once-heralded baseball prospect. In a classy response to his release, Chuck Lofgren (@chuckylof) tweeted: “Got released today by the Giants always thankful for the opportunity from the team that I grew up watching and loving. One door closes…” Although not a Major League Baseball club, American Association of Independent Professional Baseball’s Amarillo Sox happily opened the door for the multi-talented player. Since it is a rarity in baseball to find a starting pitcher who can serve as the team’s designated hitter on most pitching off days, Lofgren was a welcome addition to the 2012 Amarillo Sox roster. In his 200 at-bats, Lofgren compiled a .245 batting average with eight doubles, two triples, three homers, 32 walks and 25 RBI. Making 20 starts and working 119.2 innings, the veteran pitcher compiled a 4-6 record with a 4.36 ERA.

Chuck Lofgren's twitter photo
Chuck Lofgren’s (@chuckylof) twitter profile photo
2012-13 Brisbane Bandits pitcher Chuck Lofgren (4-3, 3.05 ERA) appears to have found his groove again playing in the Australian Baseball League. His most impressive
start on December 7th against the Perth Heat yielded 11 strikeouts
and was by far his best outing yet. Lofgren said, “Coming out you always want to face Perth. You hear that they’re the team to beat.” The 26-year-old American import went 6.2 innings and limited the reigning ABL champion Heat to just one earned run, seven hits and one walk. Lofgren may just have to sing Garth Brooks’ “Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)” again for MLB as a reminder that he still has a lot of game left in him despite being written-off prematurely.BrisbaneBandits

Top 40 Americans in the ABL: #38 Greg Van Sickler of the Perth Heat

38 baseballIf you can’t beat them, join them. After Baseball Western Australia State All-Star Pitcher Greg Van Sickler held Perth scoreless and struck out five in his four innings of perfection in the Heat’s 3-2 loss to the BWA All-Stars in a Spring Training exhibition game on October 20th, the three-time All-American Van Sickler made quite an impression on the two-time reigning Australian Baseball League champions. So much in fact that Perth wasted little time in calling him up from the Carine Cats, member of the 12-team WA State League, to join the Heat.

ABLFrom Virginia to Australia by way of Belgium, Perth Heat pitcher Greg Van Sickler has ventured on the road less traveled in pursuit of his dream in playing baseball professionally. After a stellar season playing for Belgium’s Premier League Namur Angels of the Ligue Francophone Belge de Baseball et Softball, the Virginia native is now on an Aussie baseball odyssey in Perth.

Greg Van Sickler represented the red, white and blue on America's Independence Day while playing in Europe.
Van Sickler represented Team USA on America’s Independence Day while playing in Europe.
Heat pitcher Greg Van Sickler in action against the Brisbane Bandits on December 7, 2012.(Theron Kirkman/SMP Images)
Greg Van Sickler made his ABL debut for the Perth Heat against the Brisbane Bandits on December 7th. (Theron Kirkman/SMP Images)
Greg Van Sickler, the first player in the USA South Conference history to be named both the Player and Pitcher of the Year in the same season, was 11-1 on the mound for 2011 Shenandoah University Hornets while batting .390 with seven homers and 46 RBI from the three hole in the batting order to earn first-team accolades at the utility position. The Division III All-American led the team to the NCAA Division III College World Series twice and was named 2010 and 2011 Virginia state Player of the Year by the Virginia State Sports Information Directors Association (VaSID). Van Sickler was a four-time VaSID All-State selection who earned All-America honors during his final three seasons. In both 2010 and 2011, he was a first team All-America honoree by both D3baseball.com and the American Baseball Coaches Association.

Logo-Baseball-Heat

The six-foot-two 23-year-old tipped off his talent early on while playing baseball at Winchester, Virginia’s James Wood High School, where he was named team captain and MVP twice as well as 2007 Northwestern District Player of the Year. Over five years later, Greg Van Sickler finds himself nearly 12,000 miles away from home playing for the defending ABL champs Perth Heat. In his 6.2 innings of bullpen relief, the
Top 40 American has been dominant with seven strikeouts and a 1.35 ERA.

Perth Heat relief pitcher Greg Van Sickler in 2012 ABL action (Theron Kirkman/SMP Images)
Perth Heat relief pitcher Greg Van Sickler in 2012 ABL action (Theron Kirkman/SMP Images)

Top 40 Americans in the ABL: #39 Caleb Cuevas of the Sydney Blue Sox

Blue 39When Oakland A’s closer Grant Balfour talks, people listen…especially when your father is the Australia Baseball League’s Sydney Blue Sox General Manager! Coming back from Tommy John surgery and beginning his rehab during the 2011-12 offseason, pitcher Caleb Cuevas enlisted Balfour as his workout partner to train with in Clearwater, Florida. The Aussie sent his father, Blue Sox General Manager David Balfour, an email detailing the skills Cuevas possessed. Balfour described the young American pitcher as a “flamethrower”–quite the comment from a reliever who himself lights up the radar gun with triple digits.

Oakland A's closer Grant Balfour lends a hand to the Sydney Blue Sox at Blacktown Olympic Park.
Oakland Athletics’ closer Grant Balfour lends a hand to the Sydney Blue Sox at Blacktown Olympic Park.
Not only did Balfour serve as a mentor to the 24-year-old North Carolina native, but he also recommended that the Sydney Blue Sox sign Cuevas. Caleb spoke highly of Grant Balfour and his positive reinforcement post-surgery. “Grant helped me a whole lot, particularly with my recovery and my off-speed pitching,” Cuevas said. “He was real supportive not just of
me getting back to 100%, but how
I could be an even better pitcher
once I returned completely.”

Hard-throwing reliever Caleb Cuevas is looking to make his impression on MLB scouts while working out of the Sydney Blue Sox bullpen. (Photo by Joe Vella /SMP Images)
Hard-throwing reliever Caleb Cuevas is looking
to make his impression felt while on the Sydney
Blue Sox pitching staff. (Joe Vella /SMP Images)

Although the right-handed hurler officially began his first professional season in the Can-Am League with the 2012 Newark Bears, Cuevas got his first MLB test while on the Coastal Carolina University squad when facing some big guns on the Texas Rangers lineup in an April 2012 exhibition game. Click HERE to watch him take on the likes of Napoli, Borbon, Kinsler, and Andrus. The six-foot-two pitcher was a two-time All-Western Athletic Conference pick at West Henderson High School prior to playing for Louisburg College, the Outer Banks Daredevils and Coastal Carolina.

Caleb Cuevas (Joe Vella / SMP Images)
Caleb Cuevas is the wildcard on the Blue Sox. (Joe Vella / SMP Images)
He began the 2012 season as a starter in Indy
League play before moving to the Newark Bears bullpen. In his final 14 appearances as a reliever, Cuevas posted a 2.38 ERA over 15.1 innings
of work, allowing 17 hits, six walks and four
earned runs, while striking out 18. Blue Sox
manager Jason “Pops” Pospishil took notice
of his good numbers and immediately thought
how valuable the young import could prove to be
for Sydney while echoing the sentiment shared by Oakland Athletics’ Grant Balfour. “His numbers out
of the bullpen were extremely impressive and he
also has some experience as a starter, so he will
be a flexible piece to add to our pitching staff,”
said Pospishil. The Blue Sox skipper believes that
with Cuevas’ versatility he could play various
pitching roles for Sydney this season. During his
10 ABL appearances and 10.2 innings of relief,
Cuevas has given up opponents ten runs (8.44 ERA).Sydney Blue Sox

Top 40 Americans in the ABL: #40 Dustin Loggins of the Canberra Cavalry

40Recent College of the Ozarks graduate Dustin Loggins is the youngest of four Kansas City T-Bones pitchers, who currently serve as the nucleus of the Canberra Calvary pitching staff–including teammates Steven Kent, Brian Grening and Sean Toler. The six-foot-five right-handed Missouri native was named to the 2012 All-Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference First Team after posting career bests in wins, strikeouts, and ERA during his final season of his four years playing for the Bobcats. Before joining the T-Bones, Loggins pitched 37 1/3 innings and struck out 43 with a 2.89 ERA for the Ozark Generals of the MINK Midwest Summer Collegiate Baseball League.

Canberra Cavalry pitcher Dustin Loggins (Photo courtesy of Ben Southall/SMP Images)
22-year-old Cavalry pitcher Dustin Loggins (Photo courtesy of Ben Southall / SMP Images)
Canberra Converting from a starting pitcher in college to a reliever professionally has helped his velocity touch the mid-90’s. In his 21 ABL relief appearances so far, Loggins has logged 23.1 innings and has struck out 31. With a 4-2 record, 2.31 ERA, and one save under his belt, the 22-year-old will be the Cavalry’s stopper late in games to ultimately halt the ABL reigning champion Perth Heat from a never seen before three-peat.hot-horse

Prelude to the Top 40 Americans in the ABL: MLB success story of Houston Astros’ Brandon Barnes

Top40Last December MLBblogger profiled the Top 20 Americans playing in the ABL, which was considered a holiday present to the homesick yet aspiring MLB prospects. The prized imports shared the good cheer with friends and family in the U.S.A. while playing during the offseason in Australia to fulfill their dreams of reaching the big leagues.

2011 Top 20 American in the ABL Brandon Barnes made his MLB debut in 2012
2011 Top 20 American in the ABL Brandon Barnes (Sydney Blue Sox) made his MLB debut for Houston in 2012. Photo by Tom Gannam/Associated Press
Ranked 15th in the 2011 Top 20 Americans in the ABL, former Sydney Blue Sox outfielder Brandon Barnes made his MLB debut for the Houston Astros on August 8, 2012 and became the first non-Aussie from the recently reformed Australian Baseball League to debut in the Major Leagues. As the seventh ABL star to compete in MLB after hitting .321 with 6 HRs and 30 RBI in 29 ABL games last season, Barnes joined Sydney’s Rich Thompson and Trent Oeltjen, Melbourne’s Travis Blackley and Shane Lindsay, and Perth’s Luke Hughes and Liam Hendriks as one of baseball’s elite. Brandon ventured Down Under to work on his swing and gain momentum going into Astros’ 2012 Spring Training. Although Barnes made a strong case to make the big league club, the promising Orange County, California native spent a majority of 2012 at Triple-A Oklahoma City (62 games) and Double-A Corpus Christi (44 games). The right-handed hitter was batting .321 with a .381 on-base percentage and a .514 slugging percentage when he was called up.
@TheBarnyard15 Brandon Barnes tweeted in January 2012: "Bondi Beach. One of the most amazing beaches I have ever seen.
Southern California-born and bred Brandon Barnes @TheBarnyard15 tweeted enthusiastically from Sydney on 01/10/12: “Bondi Beach. One of the most amazing beaches I have ever seen.”
Americans
Back by popular demand this holiday season, MLBblogger now presents an expanded Top 40 Americans in the ABL format to the delight of even more players and their most loyal fans abroad. Visit MLBforLife.com often for updates on all the imports. Americans Zachary Arneson, Jeremy Barnes, Anthony Claggett, Cody Clark, Zachary Fuesser, Brian Grening, Tyler Herr, Kody Hightower, K.C. Hobson, Jonathon Jones, Jack Murphy, Zach Penprase, Kevin Reese, Chris Smith, Carlo Testa, and Virgil Vasquez were named World All-Stars and are playing host Australia in the Second Annual ABL All-Star Game on December 16th.ABL All-Star Game Results

Toronto Blue Jays prospect Marcus Knecht brings Can Do Attitude from Canada to Canberra Cavalry

Detroit’s Octavio Dotel usually wrecks havoc on right-handed hitters like Canadian-born Marcus Knecht, but on April Fools in a 2012 Jays Spring Training game Toronto’s 2010 third-round draft pick had the last laugh by blasting his first Grapefruit League home run off the veteran Dominican bullpen specialist.

Ex-Jays skipper/new Boston Red Sox Manager John Farrell sits and watches Marcus Knecht
launch a home run off Octavio Dotel in a 2012 Blue Jays Spring Training game on April 1st.
Originally selected in the 23rd round of the 2008 Amateur First-Year Draft by the Milwaukee Brewers after making Langley, British Columbia’s Brett Lawrie their first-round pick, former Brewers scouting director and current Mariners General Manager Jack Zduriencik thought that a common denominator of Canadian blood would add up to two of the country’s finest prospects crossing the border together as one into Wisconsin. Mathematicians would agree that the strategy was logical since Knecht was Lawrie’s teammate on the Canadian Junior National Team, and the Brewers believed that Lawrie might be able to influence Knecht to sign with Milwaukee. Lawrie signed with the Brewers for a $1.7 million signing bonus before going to play for Team Canada in the 2008 Olympic Summer Games and eventually became a Blue Jay in a late 2010 trade for pitcher Shaun Marcum (who recently became a free agent and expressed interest in returning to the Blue Jays if the team is interested in having him back). Unlike Lawrie, Knecht instead passed on the offer to play professionally in the Brewers organization in favor of perfecting his game in U.S. collegiate ball while continuing to represent his country on Team Canada in international baseball competitions worldwide.
Brett Lawrie (center) practices with members of the Canadian Junior National Team before a
2012 Blue Jays Spring Training exhibition game. (Photo by the Canadian Baseball Network)
Jays’ Marcus Knecht
After playing on Team Canada in the 2008 World Junior Baseball Championships in Edmonton and being named to the Tournament All-Star Team, Knecht was a major contributing member of the bronze medal- winning 2010 Baseball World Cup team and the gold medal-winning 2011 Pan American Games squad. Transferring from Oklahoma State University, where he struggled to get at-bats as a freshman, to Connors State College was instrumental for Knecht to develop in an everyday role in 2010. The results were off-the-charts as Knecht hit .453 with 23 homers, 20 steals and a .540 on-base percentage. He was selected in the third-round of the 2010 Amateur First-Year Draft by the Toronto Blue Jays after being followed by ex-Jays’ scouting director and current assistant GM Andrew Tinnish.
Markus Knecht awaits the call-up to home at Rogers Centre. (Photo by Alexis Brudnicki)
Accepting a $250,000 signing bonus, Knecht signed on-the-spot with Toronto and went straight to work in launching his pro career with Short-Season Single-A affiliate Auburn Doubledays (now affiliated with the Washington Nationals). After being voted the Canadian Baseball Network Player of the Year in 2010, the six-foot-one North York, Toronto native outfielder was promoted in 2011 to Single-A Lansing, where he posted a .273 average with a team-leading 16 home runs and 86 RBI for the Lugnuts. Knecht’s offensive power was noticed early on, and he was named a 2011 Midwest League Eastern Division All-Star. After impressing Jays skipper John Farrell (now with the Boston Red Sox) with his powerful bat and quick feet on the field during 2012 Blue Jays Spring Training, Knecht was assigned to Single-A Advanced Dunedin Blue Jays. It was May Day everyday for opposing pitchers who could not stop the red-hot Knecht during the month of May, when he rattled off 28 hits (including 7 doubles, 1 triple, and 6 home runs) accounting for 22 RBI.
The 22-year-old is hoping to continue with his offensive prowess and defensive excellence as a member of the Australian Baseball League’s Canberra Cavalry. Second only to last season’s ABL Champion Perth Heat in team offense and pitching, the Canberra Cavalry narrowly missed the ABL playoffs. With the injection of Knecht’s “Can Do” attitude, Canberra will be charging right out of the gate for a 2013 playoff berth.

Perth Heat add bite to lineup with Canadian import and Arizona Diamondbacks prospect Carter Bell

Like Sex and the City starlett Kim Cattrall, Carter Bell grew up in the small Vancouver Island, BC city of Courtenay. Opting out of the A-Rod spotlight method with the usual Hollywood fanfare and paparazzi, the 22-year-old Bell chose a lower profile means of pursuing his professional baseball career under the radar by playing for the Perth Heat in the Australian Baseball League.

Brewers’ Taylor Green made his MLB debut in 2012.
Following the same path as Milwaukee Brewers’ infielder Taylor Green, the six-foot-one Canadian third baseman played high school baseball for the Parksville Royals of the British Columbia Premier Baseball League. Upon graduation, Bell was a 22nd-round selection by the San Francisco Giants in the 2008 MLB First-Year Player Draft but did not sign in favor
of accepting a scholarship to play ball for the Oregon State Beavers.
Carter Bell (far right) and fellow 2010 OSU Beavers

MLB noticed Bell early on when he donned a Team Canada uniform for the first-time at age 17. Representing his country in far away competitions held in Mexico, Japan as well as on his home turf, the BC All-Star chose the 2006 and 2007 NCAA National Champ Oregon State University baseball program to further develop his craft. The decision was sound as he was selected in the 29th round of the 2011 MLB June Amateur Draft and signed by the Arizona Diamondbacks following his junior year at OSU.
Former Yakima Bear Carter Bell stands at attention during the playing of the national anthem.
Hitting .270 in 41 games with eight doubles, two triples, one home run and 17 RBI, Bell’s pro debut with the 2011 Single-A Short Season Yakima Bears catapulted him to Single-A Advanced Visalia Rawhide in 2012. In Cal League play, he batted .259 in 81 games with 11 doubles, one triple, four home runs and 36 RBI. The road leading Down Under to the Perth Heat originated back in Oregon, where Bell played for former Perth Heat manager and long-standing Corvallis Knights skipper Brooke Knight after his first year at OSU. In his limited 10 games of 2009 West Coast League action, Bell hit .303 (10-33) with three RBI before suffering a season-ending concussion.
Former Perth Heat Manager Brooke Knight led his team to two ABL Championships.
MLB veteran and OSU All-Star Mike Thurman, a scout for the New York Yankees, was first to notice of Carter Bell’s athleticism.
Brooke Knight credits his best friend since his college days in playing ball together at Oregon State University, Mike Thurman, for pointing him in right direction just north of the border to find the Victoria-born Carter Bell, who rapidly rose to prominence in the Comox Valley Baseball Association and BC Premier Baseball League before playing as a teenager for Team Canada. Speaking on the eve before departing to Australia to assist new Perth Heat skipper Steve Fish in preparing the reigning Australian Champions for next month’s Asia Series against its foreign counterparts from Japan, Taiwan, China and South Korea, Knight explained how Canadian import Carter Bell landed Down Under: “To his credit, Carter took the initiative to call me and express his initial desire to play for the Perth Heat. He still considers it a privilege to take on this challenge. I told him it was the perfect winter league for him to get his body ready for spring because the ABL offers something that cannot be found anywhere else. The atmosphere and structure keeps players healthy because the league emphasizes safety first by limiting play to four games a week, which allows you to rest your body and properly heal.”

Knight also read Bell the disclaimer and warned him of the Aussie side effects: “I told him that Australia was culturally different as well and when it gets hot in December one can get homesick real fast and start crying out for girlfriends.” Knight feels blessed to have had the opportunity to coach such fine players as Carter Bell in Perth and Corvallis. “With guidance, I have luckily ended up with the right kids. Carter is a solid player. I’m just waiting for him to breakout. He’s got gap power and can hit the ball well the other way (to the opposite field). His power numbers will bump up as they did for import Adam Melker, a St. Louis Cardinals prospect.” Adam was Carter’s teammate on Brooke Knight’s 2009 Corvallis Knights. They will reunite under Knight’s leadership on the Perth Heat in the upcoming 2012 Asia Series on November 8-11 in Busan, South Korea. Melker hit 10 home runs for Double-A Springfield in 2012 as compared to none in 2011. Knight believes in Carter Bell. “He’s got a chance to make a difference. Carter has good range and can play the corners, not to mention he’s a Team Canada All-Star Shortstop.”

After impressing many in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization while playing for Single-A Advanced Visalia Rawhide in 2012, prospect Carter Bell will parlay his aggressive play for
the Australian Baseball League’s Perth Heat. (Photo by Ken Weisenberger/Strike3Photos.com)