Bill Arce: the Legacy behind the Claremont European Baseball Connection

Bill Arce and Tommy Lasorda
Legendary Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Stags Baseball Coach Bill Arce with Tommy Lasorda
CMC
Claremont McKenna College is located in Claremont, California, at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains, 35 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. The top ten-ranked U.S. school is part of the seven-college consortium known as The Claremont Colleges, which includes Scripps College, Pomona College, Harvey Mudd College, Pitzer College, Claremont Graduate University and Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences.

With majestic Mount Baldy providing the perfect backdrop for the optimal collegiate baseball setting, the late and great Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Stags Baseball Head Coach Bill Arce fulfilled his promise to empower those who played on the Arce Field of Dreams to attain excellence. Former student athlete Wes Parker, who played under Coach Arce from 1959-1961, enjoyed a career with the LA Dodgers from 1964-1971. Arce once said, “Wes was the hardest worker I ever had. He honed his great natural talent with tremendous work ethic.”

Baseball in Europe

When Internationally-acclaimed broadcast journalist Josh Chetwynd wrote his book “Baseball in Europe: A Country by Country History” (2008), he acknowledged the invaluable contribution of legendary Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Baseball Coach Bill Arce. In his introduction, author Josh Chetwynd wrote: Some Americans have made a commitment to the European game for no reason but for the love of the sport. During the Battle of the Bulge, Bill Arce was a member of General George Patton’s Third Army. Injured in the fighting, Arce prayed to God. He promised that if he were to survive, he’d spend his life in a meaningful way. Arce would go on to become a university professor, administrator and baseball coach–and would give to European baseball like no other. Often paying out of his own pocket, he was the first American coach to hold baseball clinics in Sweden (1962), Czechoslolvakia (1969) and Yugoslavia (1979). All told, he worked in fifteen different European countries and was the only person to have coached two different countries–the Netherlands (in 1971) and Italy (in 1975) to a European Baseball Championship. europeIn his first chapter on the Netherlands in “Baseball in Europe: A Country by Country History”, Josh Chetwynd retraced the story how Bill Arce became involved in coaching abroad: Bill Arce’s entry into European baseball was mere happenstance. “I was on a plane trip with a professor from Stanford going to a convention in New York,” recalled Arce about his 1960 introduction to the European game. “At the bottom of the sports page, I noticed an item saying Holland had won the European baseball tournament. I commented that would be a great way to spend a leave from college, working with baseball players in a country like Holland.” Sometime after that he received a letter from a friend who was serving as the American consul in Amsterdam saying they were looking for a coach. Arce, who served as athletic director and head coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, jumped at the opportunity in 1962.

Bill Arce
During his 25-year tenure as head baseball coach and as the founding athletic director of the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps athletic department, Bill Arce developed the program, facilities and staff into one of the top NCAA Division III private college programs in the country.

Flag of Netherlands (5)The book “Baseball in Europe: A Country by Country History” elaborated on the significant impact Bill Arce had on baseball abroad: Arce would become not only a tireless teacher for the Dutch but also a master organizer.  As the Dutch Baseball Hall of Famer Han Urbanus put it years later: “Bill Arce became one of the most famous and trusted coaches in our baseball history.” 

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On Arce’s initial trip, he took a leave of absence from his U.S. academic commitments and spent more than a year working with Dutch players. For years after that, he brought college-aged teams to Holland to play and coach. Arce’s players were central figures in improving play in Holland. So much so “that the impact it had on Dutch baseball is still felt there today,” wrote longtime Atlanta Braves scout Bill Clark in 1995. A top-flight coach, he would also lead the Netherlands to a gold medal in the 1971 European Baseball Championship.

Italy flagAfter much success coaching in Holland, international ambassador Bill Arce crossed enemy lines to help Euro rival Italy in developing its baseball program. After managing the Italian national team in the 1973 and 1975 Intercontinental Cups, he ended Italy’s 21-year drought by bringing home the 1975 European Baseball Championship title.

ABCA

After being inducted into both the Dutch and Italian Baseball Halls of Fame, Bill Arce’s influence still reigned internationally. Following the conclusion the 2011 American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) Convention, MLB International’s Jason Holowaty said: “For me the highlight was a special dinner hosted by MLB to honor Bill Arce, one of the first U.S. college coaches to start visiting Europe and a central figure in the development of European baseball and MLB International. Through the years he has influenced so many people in international baseball, including myself. EBCA logoIt was great for everyone to get a chance to say thank you to such an important man.” He was also honored when given the European Baseball Coaches Association (EBCA) Career Achievement Award in 2012. Arce launched the EBCA exchange program, an initiative to develop European coaches’ insights in every aspect of the game through collaborative mentoring by experienced American coaches.

PrintThe Stags legend finished his college coaching career with an impressive 606-472-7 record. Prior to his passing in 2016, Bill Arce was inducted into the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletic Coaches and the American Baseball Coaches Halls of Fame as well as received the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Distinguished Service Award.

Arce Field
Bill Arce Field is home to Stags baseball on the campus of Claremont McKenna College.
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Team Italia reaches #9 in World Baseball Rankings

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Team Italia pitching coach Bill Holmberg visits with Roberto Angotti (Photo by IandI-GoPro.com).

9 Numeros Turma da Mônica 9 nove dedinhos Colorir Pintar ImprimirThe European Baseball Coaches Association recently recognized Team Italia pitching coach Bill Holmberg for his excellence by honoring him with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Having grown the game abroad for over ten years as the MLB director and coach in residence at the FIBS Italian Academy in Tirrenia, Italy, Holmberg has been instrumental in the advancement and development of baseball in Europe. The fruits of his labor in Italy have blossomed from the Youth to the National Team levels as witnessed by the Azzurri’s ascent from #11 to #9 in the WBSC March 2016 World Rankings. A former Chicago Cubs scout who knows what it takes to be competitive in MLB, Holmberg helped Alessandro Maestri, Alex Liddi, Alberto Mineo and Marten Gasparini launch professional baseball careers worldwide. 2016 World Rankings

 

Roberto Angotti interviews MLB European academies consultant and France bench coach Andy Berglund

im_mlbinternational_132x92 On my recent journey to the 2014 European Baseball Championship in Regensberg, Germany, I was fortunate to speak with 37-year-old MLB European academies consultant and 2014 Team France bench coach Andy Berglund. His energy and passion for the game was apparent on and off the field. Serving as France manager Eric Gagne’s right-hand man, Berglund proved to be worth his weight in gold as the French advanced with Italy and Germany to the second round of competition in Brno, Czech Republic.

Andy Burgland led the Czech Republic to its first ever Silver Medal and was nominated as 2011 European Baseball Coaches Association Coach of the Year.
Andy Berglund has been big news since he set foot in Europe. He first gained notoriety after leading the Czech Republic national team to their first ever Silver Medal and being nominated for the 2011 European Baseball Coaches Association (EBCA) Coach of the Year Award. (Photo courtesy of www.Mister-Baseball.com)
Roberto: Let’s start from the beginning. You grew up in Valley City, North Dakota and attended the University of Minnesota, where you graduated magna cum laude in Public Relations in 2001. You played literally every single position, correct?
Andy Berglund: I played outfield and pitched when I was in high school and in college I was a utility player in the leagues I played in. I had two shoulder surgeries during my college years that knocked me out of competition. When I was healthy again I played that utility role over in Europe and Australia. I did catch some games in Europe, so I’ve played every position.

Roberto: Did that help you later as a coach knowing the roles and responsibilities of each position?

Andy Berglund: Absolutely. I think once you’ve played the position, you at least have a feel for what a player goes through. There are some many intangibles (receiving, blocking, throwing, calling a game, being a vocal captain of the infield) to being a solid catcher, for example, that to teach it at a higher level, I think you have to also experience it as well.

Roberto: You actually began coaching youth baseball while still very young, right? What attracted you to this profession?
Andy Berglund: I started coaching youth baseball when I was still around 15, during summers in North Dakota. My father was a high school wrestling, football and baseball coach, so I took after him and saw how much enjoyment he got out of coaching. I started focusing more on coaching as a profession when I realized injuries were going to keep me from reaching the level I wanted to on the field. I didn’t want to be away from the game, and coaching was the next logical step.
Andy Berglund and Mark Melancon
Andy Berglund and Mark Melancon

Roberto: Did you consider playing professionally in America before embarking on your first European adventure playing in Sweden for the Alby Stars and coaching the Eliteserien team in 2002? How were you recruited?
Andy Berglund: To be honest, I was planning on going to law school out of college. After I graduated, an opportunity came about to go to Europe for the summer, and I discovered baseball was developing there. I worked for MLB International that first summer and through meeting other European players, I landed a spot in Sweden. Those first two summers got my foot in the door to the playing and coaching opportunities I’ve had over the last 13 years now in Europe.

Roberto: Knowing European baseball was in its infancy, did you have the patience to grow the game?
Andy Berglund: To me, the game is still in a grass roots phase here, just trying to be mentioned with soccer and hockey, which dominate the European landscape. Your patience is definitely tested at times, but that’s the beauty of the challenge. I’ve met dozens and dozens of people in the same situation in Europe baseball development, who have had their own part in growing this beautiful game on European soil.
Roberto: Was it difficult to play in adverse weather conditions in North Dakota and later in Scandinavia? Please describe the worst care scenario you ever played in.
Andy Berglund: The cold conditions you deal with are part of growing up in the north for sure. I’ve played in games where snow was coming down, actually coached in games in April in Prague where it was snowing and have been “snowed-out” in games up in Sweden. Coaching the Czechs in the World Baseball Classic Qualifier in 2012 was brisk. There were parkas everywhere in the stands.
Roberto: You played baseball internationally in England, and Western Australia as well, correct? Exactly where? How did that help your mission?
Andy Berglund: I played for the Melville Braves in Western Australia. They actually won the WA State League title this past year, so I’m very happy for the club. It was a long time coming. The experience in Australia was very helpful in me seeing how aggressive they played the game. The Aussie’s are just flat out tough characters on the field. I truly respected that about them. Part of the mission here in Europe is to make the players tougher and more game-tested, and the experience in Australia was a good reference point. I loved how they played. The game has developed a lot in Australia the past 10 years as well with the ABL coming back and more and more players in the U.S.Roadshow
Roberto: When did you become a Major League Baseball International coach?
Andy Berglund: Working with the MLB Roadshow from 2001-2004 in the UK and Germany. I started as an MLB Envoy in 2009 in Germany and 2010-2011 in the Czech Republic.
Roberto: Your coaching stints for MLB included time in England, Sweden and three years in Germany, correct?
Andy Berglund: Yes, and that’s expanded into the role I have now, which is an MLB Academies Consultant. There are nearly 20 different Academies in 11 different European countries now that MLB supports with coaching, equipment and player development.
Roberto: As the Ambassador for MLB and its development in the UK and Germany, you introduced baseball to over 20,000 children for their first time. Describe that experience. How were you recruited for this position?
Andy BerglundAs part of the MLB Roadshow, we would spend weeks on the road and each week visit new schools in bigger German and UK cities to introduce the game of baseball. The goal of the program was to introduce the sport and get kids excited about playing and joining local clubs and participating in MLB’s Pitch, Hit & Run program as well. I was recruited through a friend named Ian Young and in turn met Jason Holowaty, who I now work directly with on game development in Europe and Africa.

Andy Berglund and Prince Fielder
Andy Berglund and Prince Fielder
Roberto: You returned to the states to earn your Masters in Communications from North Dakota State University in 2006. How did you balance your love for the game in Europe while missing family back home?
Andy Berglund: The toughest part of working in Europe is being away from family and I try to get back as often as I can. My oldest brother has three young sons, and it’s challenging being away and missing the finer parts of watching them grow up. Still, we find ways to see each other every year and make the most of it.
Roberto: Considering you returned to Northern Europe as a player and coach for the Stockholm Baseball Club in 2008, you must have loved it there. In fact, you led the team to its first ever Swedish Championship. Did that validate your belief that you could instill success into the mindset of other players?
Andy Berglund: Sweden is a beautiful country. That season, I specifically wanted to come back over to coach, play and win a title with Bjorn and Peter Johannessen, who had became friends over the years. I was really welcomed there by the Claesson family, who oversee the club. The dedicated people in the club made it a goal to really put together an action plan to develop the youth programs and build the best club in Sweden. Stockholm has won 5 of the last 7 Swedish championships since then and have a solid youth program with new facilities being built.
Roberto: You later became a member of the Swedish Senior National Team in 2009. At that point, did you know coaching in Europe was your destiny?
Andy Berglund: Not fully, but I knew that there would always be an attraction to coaching baseball in Europe not matter where I was in the world.
Roberto: However, it appeared that the West Coast was tugging at your uniform as you spent time in Newport Beach, Laguna Beach, Dana Point and Carlsbad. What attracted you to Southern California?
Sage Hill H.S. manager Andy Berglund
Sage Hill High School head coach Andy Berglund was named 2008 Academy League High School Coach of the Year for his excellence.

Andy Berglund: I wanted to experience baseball year-round and found a great opportunity to coach at a high school in Newport Beach. It was my first real head coaching position, and I really enjoyed learning what it takes to try and build a championship program.
Roberto: You began as the head coach for Sage Hill High School in Newport Beach in 2008 after the baseball team had endured its third consecutive losing season. You turned things around there after developing a thorough communication program involving the student-athletes and their parents. You were selected as 2008 Academy League High School Coach of the Year. While at Sage, you put together a 51-18 overall record which included two league titles and one second place finish. During this time you were influenced by the likes of Mark McGwire, Wally Joyner, Bruce Hurst, and Lee Smith. You also studied the modern science of pitching with Tom House and Ron Wolforth. Care to comment on your experience coaching in Orange County and working with these former pros?
Andy Berglund: I had seen videos on Ron Wolforth’s Athletic Pitching program and read books on Tom House’s pitching philosophy as a way to learn more as a coach, on arm action and pitching. We were fortunate enough to have Tom House come visit Sage Hill for a practice and he worked brilliantly with our pitchers. I met Ron Wolforth this past year at a conference in Paris. I thanked him for showing me a new way to train and protect young pitchers arms. I met Mark McGwire while doing ProKids Academy camps with his sons back in Southern California and picked up some great hitting tips from him. Joyner, Hurst and Smith, I met later on at our European Elite Academy in Italy. They are all wonderful teachers. You’d have to pinch yourself sometimes, being such a fan of these guys growing up, and then having conversations with them. The past few years the Elite Camp has featured Barry Larkin, Steve Finley, Greg Swindell, Tom Gordon, John McLaren, Art Howe and Dale Murphy, to name a few. It’s an amazing experience to pick these guys’ brains on the game.
Roberto: You left it all behind to become the head coach for the Eagles Praha of the Czech Pro League. In addition, you served as head coach for the Czech Senior and Junior National Teams in 2011 and 2012–leading to the highest finishes in the country’s history (Silver Medal). Did that give you confidence that you could impact a developing nation’s appetite for the game?
Andy Berglund: My time on the field in the Czech Republic was very rewarding. We took the same approach with trying to build on what was already there and fine-tune it into something special. I think you said it correctly, because the appetite for baseball in the Czech is definitely growing and they are really having some success. It’s great to see their young teams go to the Little League World Series, the World Championships and have the success they are having. It proves a small baseball country can achieve big things.
Curtis Granderson (third from the right) and Andy Bergund (far right)
Curtis Granderson (third from the right) and Andy Berglund (far right) on the MLB Roadshow

Roberto: How did it feel being nominated as the EBCA Coach of the Year in 2011 and speaking at the Coaches Convention?
Andy Berglund: I was very fortunate to be considered and very happy for Brian Farley when he won. I thought the Dutch’s 2011 World Championship really helped put European baseball on the map in ways it had never been before. Now the Dutch and Italians are beating traditional baseball powerhouses in the World Baseball Classic and it is great for the exposure and development of the game overseas.
Roberto: Did you start up the Czech MLB Baseball Academy?
Andy Berglund: No, Martin Smidt started the Prague Academy and David Winkler started the Brno Baseball Academy. I help with their development on behalf of MLB. The Brno Academy has really developed into a solid program and a lot of those players are representing the Czech U15, U18 and U21 teams that are winning medals at the European Championships.
Czech Republic manager Andy Berglund visits pitcher Alex Sogard in the 2012 World Baseball Classic Qualifier.
Czech Republic lefty Alex Sogard listens to manager Andy Berglund in the 2012 WBC Qualifier.

Roberto: Did you enjoy serving as the bench coach for Team France in the 2014 European Baseball Championship?
Andy Berglund: Yes. A lot of work was put into getting France back on the right track by the federation, so it was good to be a part of.
Roberto: You have been a strong advocate for baseball in both France and Czech Republic. Both teams made strong showing in the Euros and their numbers have jumped up considerably in the International Baseball Rankings. Do you think that your coaching has catapulted these countries into becoming up-and-coming powerhouses?
Andy Berglund: I would say the success in France and the Czech Republic has been result of the good people in the federation that are willing to push the envelope for development working well with the best coaches in the country. It takes getting into a room, getting to the bottom line, discussing the resources you have, putting together a blueprint and attacking the goal you all want to achieve. Throw away the politics. Get down to business. For me, wherever I have coached, my goal was never to finish anywhere but the top. Once the players embrace that vision, you truly have something powerful and dangerous anytime you step on the field.
Roberto: Do you believe MLB will embrace European baseball as they have in other parts of the world and invest there beyond the MLB academies?
Andy Berglund: I do. I know they are looking into having an opening MLB series being played in Europe, much like they did in Australia this past year. I know it is an intriguing market for MLB, especially with the success the NFL has had hosting games in London and the NHL has had hosting games in Europe.
Roberto: What is your personal opinion on the future of baseball in Europe?
Andy Berglund: It’s going to continue to grow. You are going to continue to see more players signed out of Europe and Africa. Hopefully soon, you’ll see more of them playing in the Big Leagues. The process is just going to take time. The level of play here has definitely increased; the domestic leagues have become stronger, as have the national teams. There are some more established countries here in Europe that have strong ambitions to take the game to another level, numbers wise, exposure wise and game development wise. They will be leading the charge to see where the game is over the next 5-10 years.
Team France at the 2014 European Baseball Championship was led by bench coach Andy Berglund (fifth from right) and manager Eric Gagne (far right).
Led by bench coach Andy Berglund (fifth from the right) and manager Eric Gagne (far right),
France placed sixth in the 2014 European Baseball Championship in Brno, Czech Republic.

Barry Larkin and Andy Berglund
Barry Larkin and Andy Berglund
Roberto: It’s nice to know MLB veterans like France manager Eric Gagne and Italy hitting coach Mike Piazza are on board?
Andy Berglund: Definitely. They bring even more exposure to the sport and raise the interest that much higher. You are talking about two huge names in baseball that only stopped playing in the MLB less than 10 years ago. To have them involved is huge for marketing the sport and also raising the interest back in the U.S. on how and why these guys are getting involved.
Roberto: Any final thoughts to share?
Andy Berglund: The last thing I’ll mention is something I’ve learned from Barry Larkin. His advice to the game is: “Get Better Every Day. Today, be better than you were yesterday. And tomorrow, be better than you were today.” I think that’s the best way to look at what we are all trying to accomplish in baseball, as players, coaches and in development, to keep you humble and to keep you motivated.

Pericolosi instructs EU, Aussie & American players and coaches how to play fun, competitive baseball

Pomona-Pitzer Head Coach Frank Pericolosi's field of dreams in Claremont, California
Mingling with fans and players alike, SF Giant closer Brian Wilson was quite the gentleman by cordially signing autographs and posing for photographs at Coach Pericolosi's 2011 Pomona-Pitzer Alumni Game.
With the beautiful snow-capped Southern California foothills and Mount Baldy providing a majestic backdrop for the perfect collegiate baseball setting, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehen Head Coach Frank Pericolosi has been an inspiration for past, present and future MLB players. 2010 World Series Champion San Francisco Giant closer Brian Wilson is a big supporter of Pericolosi as he coached his former roommate, Pitzer class of 1994 alum Adam Gardiner. The list of MLB players who have worked under the watchful eye of this international baseball ambassador grows constantly.

Two of Pomona-Pitzer Head Coach Pericolosi's recent graduates in the Red Sox organization, James Kang of the AAA Pawtucket Red Sox (Pitzer 2010) and Drew Hedman of the AA Portland Sea Dogs (Pomona 2009) played in Boston's 2010 Futures at Fenway.

Before coaching at Pomona-Pitzer, Pericolosi was the assistant coach for the Cape Cod Baseball League Brewster Whitecaps and mentored future Major Leaguers Mike Aviles, Chris Dickerson, Tony Gwynn Jr., Taylor Tankersley and Sean White.
He has been one of the most sought after baseball experts in Europe since 2000. Pericolosi coached the Swedish National Baseball Team for two years and spent three summers in Sweden as a MLB International envoy coach. He also spent two additional summers in Sweden as a player/coach for the Leksand Lumberjacks and two years in Belgium as a player/coach for the Brussels Kangaroos. During the summer of 2010, Pericolosi served as a coaching consultant with the San Martino Junior Baseball Club in Italy.

Australian Baseball League CEO Peter Wermuth played Sagehen baseball and graduated from Pomona College in 2000. The German native also coached at Georgia State.

He has since become a magnet in the European Baseball Coaches Association exchange program, an initiative to develop European coaches’ insights in every aspect of the game through collaborative mentoring by experienced American coaches like Pericolosi at some of the best collegiate baseball programs including Pomona-Pitzer. From running team practices to covering coaching mechanics, strategy and philosophy, participants have the opportunity to closely work with host coaches to fine tune their craft. A 2000 graduate of Pomona College–where he played baseball–and a former coach for the Georgia State Panthers, Australian Baseball League CEO Peter Wermuth commented, “Our Pomona-Pitzer head coach, Frank Pericolosi, has a strong international orientation and has taken this initiative (EBCA exchange program). Frank has coached down here in Australia a few times, and we have set up an ABL intern program. But more importantly, he has coached in Europe for many years, and I am excited that he has made Pomona-Pitzer one of the pioneers in the European Baseball Coaches Association exchange program.”

Coach Frank Pericolosi has shared his internationally-acclaimed coaching expertise with some of Australia's finest MLB prospects as well as children playing for the Victorian Baseball League Geelong Baycats.

A sabbatical leave from Pomona College in the fall of 2009 would prove to be a blessing for those Aussie athletes who were fortunate enough to be taken under Pericolosi’s wing.
He worked his magic as an assistant coach for Baseball Victoria Geelong Baycats in Australia, where he strengthened the Baycats’ coaching structures and methodology.

Pitcher David Colvin (Pomona 2011) posted a 35-7 career record on the mound for the Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens and was selected by the Seattle Mariners
in the 27th round of the 2011 MLB amateur draft.

Competing at the highest level in the Victorian State League, the Geelong Baycat coach assisted with all the teams in the club–from children to the most competitive team. Pericolosi also provided instruction at a MLB youth clinic and in addition to serving as an assistant coach with the Victorian U-14 State Team. “Kids play baseball for right reason,” Pericolosi said. “Because it’s fun. For me, the most gratifying thing is to see a player improve and know you were part of that process. Coaches and teachers had a very powerful effect on my development as a person. I would like one of my players to say that about me…”

Sagehen Kevin Brice (Pomona 2016) is just one of many promising future baseball stars from Coach Pericolosi's school of competitive baseball fun that dream of MLB.

Pericolosi is so popular that prospective players are making significant life-changing decisions based on his reputation of running a first-class collegiate baseball program to accompany the quality education afforded by the prestigious Claremont University Consortium. Kevin Brice, a senior from Salpointe Catholic High School in Tuscon, Arizona, chose to be part of the coach’s Pomona-Pitzer legacy of excellence recently and echoed the sentiment of mixing the best of sound mind and body in Claremont. The future Sagehen (2016) outfielder explained,
“I chose Pomona because of its great academic program and baseball program. It had a welcoming atmosphere when I visited, and it’s hard to turn down playing baseball in Southern California. I really like Coach (Frank) Pericolosi. He seems laid back, honest, and he’s built up a great baseball program. I’m excited to be able to play for him next spring.” Pericolosi is just as fired up as the young slugger in his line-up based on his past baseball statistics. In 30 games last season, Brice hit for a .527 batting average–including 26 RBI, 12 doubles, five triples–and scored 53 runs. Coach Perilcolosi hopes to add him to his long list of success stories of graduates who have gone on to play professional baseball. Serving as an American Baseball Coaches Association Executive, the 36-year-old coach has had a prolific effect on the quality of the players he has mentored and actively engaged in launching professional baseball and business careers.

International Ambassador and Pomona-Pitzer Sagehen Baseball Head Coach Frank Pericolosi

Coach Pericolsi said, “It’s great for recruiting to have all these guys playing professionally. We can talk to a kid who is a borderline Division I athlete and say that you’ll still have the chance to get drafted or play overseas and get a great education in the process. It’s also great for all those guys to continue playing. They’ll end up in the business world or other things when they’re done, but in the meantime, they get to play a few more years of baseball.” He speaks from first-hand experience as the Connecticut native attended Northwest Catholic High School in West Hartford, where here was named All-State in baseball and honorable mention All-State in football during his senior year. A 1997 graduate of Massachusetts’ Williams College–where he excelled in both collegiate football and baseball–Pericolosi was named All-Conference and All-Region in baseball. In addition, he played two summers for the New England Collegiate Baseball League Middletown Giants. Pericolosi was selected as an All-Star and named to the NECBL All-League team in 1995. He later played in Europe.

Whether player or head coach, Frank Pericolsi has always given his best effort and in return he expects that same level of commitment from everyone around him. The bottom line is that Pericolsi knows how to get the most out of his players. Conversely, it’s no secret that players worldwide have trusted that they can depend on their “living legend” coach to give them their best shot of success on and off the field while having fun in the process.