Dodgers’ Punto and Butera honored in San Diego at Convivio’s Italian American Baseball Exhibition

nedcollettiTried and tested as “Azzurri” teammates on Team Italy in the 2013 World Baseball Classic, utility infielder Nick Punto and backup catcher Drew Butera quite naturally bleed Dodger blue. Butera was reunited with Team Italy leadoff hitter Nick Punto when he was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers on July 31, 2013. Destined to get the most from one of MLB’s finest pitching staffs, Drew is a valuable asset to the dream team of Dodger General Manager Ned Colletti. Born on August 9, 1983, the Florida-native is the son of Sal Butera—a journeyman catcher who played 359 MLB games for the Blue Jays, Twins, Reds, Expos and Tigers from 1980-1988. Drew was selected by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2002 MLB Draft but instead opted to play college ball at the University of Central Florida (UCF). Ironically, father Sal now works as a scout for the only Canadian MLB franchise.fathersonbutera

LA's newest addition, catcher Drew Butera
Los Angeles Dodgers’ recent acquisition, star backup catcher Drew Butera will prove to be worth his weight in gold during the postseason run to the World Series.
After throwing out 48% of potential base-stealers and hitting .325 in his last season at UCF, the right-handed catcher was a fifth round pick by the New York Mets in the 2005 MLB Draft.
A big opera fan who used to listen to Andrea Bocelli and Luciano Pavarotti in the clubhouse before games while in the Mets’ minor league system, Drew was named Florida League All-Star and later promoted to Double-A ball in 2007 before being traded to the Twins—where Butera family history was made as Sal and Drew became the first father-son combination to play for Minnesota when he made his MLB debut on April 9, 2010. Known for being able
Nick Punto, Carl Pavano and Drew Butera in 2010.
Nick Punto, Carl Pavano and Drew Butera in 2010.
to handle pitches with grace rarely seen at the major league level, he became the exclusive catcher for Carl Pavano. Having a producing a calming effect on his pitching staff while calling a great game from behind the plate, Butera kept Francisco Liriano focused on every pitch which garnered the lefty a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox on May 3, 2011. Known as a pitcher’s catcher, Drew even went as far as taking the mound to throw a scoreless inning (including a strike out) against the Brewers in 2012.
Team Italy catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto
Team Italy catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto at Chase Field in Phoenix, Arizona.
Drew Butera was a big hit for Team Italy in the 2013 World Baseball Classic. Delivering a two-run home run that helped defeat Mexico and a two-run double that buried Canada. Butera was instrumental in each of Team Italy’s victories to earn the team the right to advance with Team USA to the next round of play in Miami. Dodger teammate Nick Punto was just as important in the WBC. Punto led off in every one of Team Italy’s five games and raked at the plate (.421 batting average, 8-for-19, two doubles, two walks and five runs scored). Both players along with Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Tony Lazzeri, Roy Campanella, Yogi Berra, Ernie Lombardi, Ron Santo, Tommy Lasorda, Tony Conigliaro, Craig Biggio, Tony La Russa, John D’Aquisto, Ken Caminiti, Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto, Joey Votto, Jason Grilli, Anthony Rizzo, Chris Denorfia, Dan Serafini, Alex Liddi, Chris Colabello, Brian Sweeney, Mike Costanzo and Reid Rizzo are featured in the Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball Exhibit at Convivio, 2157 India Street in San Diego. Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball showcases original artwork, photographs, uniforms, articles, and other related artifacts related to baseball players of Italian descent and those with strong ties to San Diego. Works by nenowned Italian American artists Christopher Paluso, James Fiorentino, Vincent Scilla, Professor John Giarrizzo, Warren Reed, Zack D’Ulisse, and Rob Monte will be on display alongside sports artists Chris Felix, Vernon Wells, Jr., and Jeremy Nash at the Little Italy Heritage Museum at Convivio Center. For more information on the exhibit and special events–including player and artist appearances, visit www.ConvivioSociety.org or phone 619-573-4140.
Drew Butera has been known to surprise pitchers with his pop at the plate.
LA Dodgers’ catcher Drew Butera has been known to surprise pitchers with his pop at the plate.

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James Fiorentino contributes to Italian American baseball exhibit in San Diego’s Little Italy

Fiorentino DiMaggioChaperoned by his parents after just becoming a teenager, James Fiorentino took an artist’s leap of faith by bringing a prized Joe DiMaggio painting he had done of the legendary Yankee great to an autograph show that DiMaggio was appearing at. Fiorentino reminisced: “He was always tough at these things and usually didn’t sign artwork. He looked at me and said, ‘Oh my gosh! Did you do this?’ I guess for him to even say something was kind of a big reaction. He seemed to like it and autographed it for me. I met DiMaggio a few times after that. He was always very nice to me and would talk to me.” Not long after his initial contact with DiMaggio, Fiorentino became the youngest artist to ever be featured in the National Baseball Hall of Fame at age 15 with his portrait of Reggie Jackson. Although two decades have passed, Fiorentino to this day still treasures that signed Joe DiMaggio painting close to his heart.

Yogi Berra and James Fiorentino at age 15
Italian American icon Yogi Berra and James Fiorentino at age 15
The Upper Deck Legends Fiorentino Collection includes Joe DiMaggio, Babe Ruth, Satchel Paige, Willie Mays, Ty Cobb, Nolan Ryan, Lou Gehrig, Jackie Robinson, Hank Aaron, Roberto Clemente, Stan Musial, Johnny Bench, Honus Wagner and Reggie Jackson. Although Fiorentino is proud of all of his subjects, the teenage encounter with Baseball Hall of Famer Yogi Berra is cited as his all-time favorite. “He was the first player who actually made a reproduction of my artwork. He had me to his house when I was 15 and signed pieces for me,” said Fiorentino, who was honored to have an exhibition at the Yogi Berra Museum in recent years. “He’s a Jersey guy who just loves baseball—like me, I guess.”Yogi Berra
Tony Conigliaro "Spirit and Determination" by James Fiorentino
‘Tony C’ Conigliaro “Spirit and Determination” by James Fiorentino
James Fiorentino was recently honored during a two-day gala sponsored by the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in our nation’s capital. Proud of his Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans in the arts and sports, he showcased some of his latest original artwork at the Washington Hilton Hotel and donated a painting of Yogi Berra (also signed by Berra) to NIAF’s celebrity luncheon auction as a way to give back to his fellow Italian Americans.NIAF logo
Heralded as the youngest artist ever to be inducted into the prestigious New York Society of Illustrators–where his work is displayed along with the likes of Rockwell, Pyle, Holland, and Fuchs–Fiorentino has always been inspired to share his talents with those who need it most from day one. “The thing I’m most proud of is that I’m allowed to help out charities by donating my work,” said Fiorentino. “That’s a big part of my life, playing a lot of golf outings, donating work, helping people out.”
MLB Executive VP of Baseball Operations Joe Torre and James Fiorentino
MLB Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations Joe Torre and artist James Fiorentino
summer41_joe_dimaggioFeatured on national and regional media outlets including ESPN, MSG, FOX, and the New York Times, Fiorentino is considered one of the best sports artists in the world. Each of the hand-painted retro-inspired cards found in 2003 Upper Deck Play Ball Baseball Card Series –including the Joe DiMaggio 56 card Yankee Clipper 1941 Hitting Streak Box Score cards and the Summer of ’41 cards–is truly a Fiorentino work of perfection. Art seen at JamesFiorentino.com has graced the walls of the National Basketball and Cycling Hall of Fames, the Ted Williams and Roberto Clemente Museums, the National Art Museum of Sport and the Sports Museum of America. Fiorentino’s talent will be showcased next month at Convivio in San Diego’s Little Italy in an Italian American baseball exhibit paying homage to artists of Italian descent and Team Italy players and coaches in the 2013 World Baseball Classic.
A Tribute to Italian American Artists and Team Italy in the World Baseball Classic opens September 21st at Convivio in San Diego
A Tribute to Italian American Artists and Team Italy
in the World Baseball Classic opens September 25th at Convivio, 2157 N. India Street in San Diego, CA.
Some of the big names represented include future Hall of Famer Mike Piazza, 2013 National League All-Star and Pirates’ closer Jason Grilli, Padres’ Chris Denorfia, Dodgers’ Nick Punto and Drew Butera, Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo, Twins’ Chris Colabello, Orioles’ Alex Liddi, Mariners’ Brian Sweeney, Reds’ Mike Costanzo and Tim Crabbe, Giants’ Tyler LaTorre and MLB veterans Frank Catalanotto and Dan Serafini. In addition to original work from renowned Italian American artists James Fiorentino, Vincent Scilla, Professor John Giarrizzo, Rob Monte and Zack D’Ulisse, other critically-acclaimed artists on display will include Vernon Wells Jr., Tom Richmond, Jeremy Nash and photographer Robb Long.Little Italy San Diego, View on Sign