Celebrate “Baseball Italian Style” in San Francisco on April 26 and San Diego on April 28, 2018

baseball-italian-style-baldassaro-lawrenceThe Museo Italo Americano and the San Francisco Italian Athletic Club as well as the San Diego Little Italy’s Amici House and Convivio are proud to co-present exciting nights in San Francisco (April 26) and San Diego (April 28) celebrating “Baseball Italian Style”. Special guests include renowned author Lawrence Baldassaro (Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball and Baseball Italian Style) and award-winning filmmaker Roberto Angotti (Italian American Baseball Family). Professor Lawrence Baldassaro will sign all books purchased at these once-in-a-lifetime events. Lovers of history and baseball alike will be mesmerized with the newfound knowledge exchanged in San Francisco and San Diego.

Beyond DiMaggio
“Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball” by Professor Lawrence Baldassaro was originally published in 2011.

Engaging critically-acclaimed author Lawrence Baldassaro will present his new book Baseball Italian Style: Great Stories Told by Italian American Major Leaguers from Crosetti to Piazza, which brings together the memories of major leaguers of Italian heritage whose collective careers span almost a century from the 1930s until today. The men who speak in this collection, which includes eight Hall of Famers (Yogi Berra, Phil Rizzuto, Ron Santo, Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza, Tommy Lasorda, Tony La Russa, and Joe Torre), go beyond statistics to provide an inside look at life in the big leagues. Their stories provide a time capsule that documents not only the evolution of Italian American participation in the national pastime but also the continuity of the game and the many changes that have taken place, on and off the field. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Professor Emeritus Lawrence Baldassaro will donate all royalties from his book, Baseball Italian Style, to the Jimmy Fund in Boston, which supports the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, raising funds for adult and pediatric cancer care and research. Purchase the book now by clicking HERE.

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Baseball Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda and Lawrence Baldassaro, who served as interpreter for Team Italy during the 2016 World Baseball Classic

Immediately following Professor Baldassaro’s lecture, the award-winning documentary, Italian American Baseball Family, will be shown. Director Roberto Angotti will introduce the film and author Lawrence Baldassaro will be available for book signings immediately following the movie. Recipient of a grant from the National Italian American Foundation, the Italian Sons and Daughters of America and the Russo Brothers, Angotti documented the Italian American experience on how Italians assimilated into popular culture through America’s favorite pastime, and how Italian Americans have circled back to Italy to help grow the game abroad by playing for Team Italy in the Olympics and the World Baseball Classic. He is excited to bring the movie to San Francisco, hometown of Ping Bodie, Tony LazzeriFrank Crosetti, the DiMaggio brothers and so many others. Italian American Baseball Family traverses the U.S. cultural landscape and documents an ethnic group’s rise from adversity by celebrating its triumphs in breaking into a sport originally dominated by English, Irish and German immigrants. The film showcases both the hardships and accomplishments of legendary Italian American baseball players.

Angotti Baldassaro photo
Director Roberto Angotti and author Lawrence Baldassaro at the National Italian American Foundation 42nd Anniversary Gala on November 4, 2017 in Washington, D.C.
SFIAC
The San Francisco Italian Athletic Club has served the Italian American community for over 100 years.

To reserve tickets for the Thursday, April 26 event at the San Francisco Italian Athletic Club, 1630 Stockton Street in San Francisco’s North Beach, call Museo Italo Americano at 415-673-2200 or click HERE. The fun begins promptly at 6 pm with complimentary antipasti and a no-host bar.

Little Italy SD

Tickets for the Saturday, April 28 event at Amici House, located at Amici Park (250 Date Street at the corner of Union and Date Streets) in San Diego’s Little Italy can be reserved HERE. The welcome reception begins at 6 pm. Guests will be escorted to the lecture and film screening at nearby Washington Elementary Auditorium.

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Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum Award winner Roberto Angotti celebrates Italian Americans in Baseball in new documentary

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Filmmaker Roberto Angotti at the second annual Italian American Baseball Foundation Dinner supporting Federazione Italiana Baseball Softball (FIBS) at Carmine & Sons Restaurant in Brooklyn, New York on December 7, 2017 (Photo by Chris Herder)

Of the more than four million Italians who left home between 1880 and 1920 with dreams of a better life, nobody could have imagined their children fulfilling the American dream by playing a game that was as foreign to them as the English language. Examining the experiences of baseball pioneers, current players and coaches, fans, and historians, filmmaker Roberto Angotti captures the story of how Italian Americans assimilated into popular culture through America’s favorite pastime in his new hour-long Italian American Baseball Family documentary. The film also explores how Italian Americans have circled back to Italy to help grow the game abroad by playing for Team Italy in the Olympics and the World Baseball Classic. Although brothers Vince, Joe, and Dom DiMaggio may be the premier Italian American Baseball Family, the Colabellos from Milford, Massachusetts are a perfect example of the modern day Italian American Baseball Family. Father Lou Colabello was the starting pitcher for Team Italy against host Team USA at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles during the 1984 Olympics while his son Chris Colabello later played baseball in Italy as a youth and, like his father, eventually went on to represent Team Italy in the 2013 and 2017 World Baseball Classics.

The Italian American Baseball Family traverses the U.S. cultural landscape and documents an ethnic group’s rise from adversity by celebrating its triumphs in breaking into a sport originally dominated by English, Irish and German immigrants. The 2017 Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum Award-winning movie showcases both the hardships and accomplishments of legendary Italian American baseball players.

ORA on Panel
While on the Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum panel discussion at the NIAF 42nd Anniversary Gala in Washington, D.C. on November 4, 2017, Roberto Angotti spoke about his new documentary (Photo by Andy Del Giudice).

After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States declared war and began targeting those of German, Italian, or Japanese descent. The Italians were the largest immigrant group in the U.S. at the time and about 600,000 of the country’s five million Italian immigrants who had not yet naturalized were forced to register as enemy aliens. Baseball came ashore to Italy in 1944 when allied soldiers stormed the beaches of Nettuno and nearby Anzio en route to freeing Rome from its Nazi occupiers. American troops brought baseball gear and taught Italians how to play. Baseball countered the negative immigrant identity as an outsider. The game bridged the gap so that Italians could integrate into the American way of life.

The Italian American Baseball Family brings home the message that baseball allowed Italian Americans to assimilate into popular culture. The documentary honors the Italian American baseball ambassadors who have etched their names into U.S. sports history. The film pays tribute to their invaluable contributions and acknowledges those players who have left their unique imprint on the game.

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Filmmaker Roberto Angotti and baseball historian Professor Lawrence Baldassaro with the Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum Award at the NIAF 42nd Anniversary Gala in Washington, D.C. on November 4, 2017.

Filmmaker Roberto Angotti said, “It was an exhilarating experience and so rewarding to interview mentor and renowned historian Lawrence Baldassaro, author of Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball at the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame in Chicago as well as National Baseball Hall of Fame legend Tommy Lasorda. Getting to speak with MLB past and present players Frank ViolaNick Punto, Francisco Cervelli, Chris ColabelloBrandon Nimmo, and Gavin Cecchini for the Italian American Baseball Family was also a privilege and an honor.”

Roberto was fascinated by the game of baseball since he was a child and played Little League. He witnessed Tommy Lasorda lead the Los Angeles Dodgers to two World Series titles in the 1980s. In high school, he played American Legion baseball. As a Film Studies student at Claremont McKenna College (CMC), Angotti did play-by-play broadcasts for Pomona-Pitzer Baseball while program director at KSPC 88.7 FM. His education at CMC was the foundation for him to catapult into the entertainment industry. Roberto was recently the subject of a CMC alumni profile. To access the article, click on this link: https://www.cmc.edu/news/filmmaker-roberto-angotti-traces-roots-of-italian-american-baseball. Throughout his professional radio career at KNAC 105.5 FM (Long Beach), KROQ 106.7 FM (Pasadena/Los Angeles) as well as 91X and 92.5 FM (San Diego), he integrated music, sports, and popular culture to become one of the most listened to on-air personalities in Southern California.

ORA with PMcE
Director of Photography Peter McEvilley accompanied filmmaker Roberto Angotti, who received the Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum Award at the NIAF 42nd Anniversary Gala in Washington, D.C. on November 4, 2017.

In 2011 Angotti launched an MLB.com blog which eventually became a Top 10 MLB.com Fan website – www.MLBforLife.com – to showcase up-and-coming Italian and Italian American players. After visiting the Italian Baseball Academy near Pisa, Roberto was invited to the 2013 World Baseball Classic in Phoenix, Arizona, where he got to know Mike Piazza, who served as hitting coach for Team Italy. Piazza inspired him to document the Italian American experience. That same year Angotti curated the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball exhibition at the Convivio Center in San Diego’s Little Italy. The exhibit featured Italian American artists who focused their work on Italian American Baseball Hall of Famers: Tony Lazzeri, Joe DiMaggio, Roy Campanella, Yogi Berra, Ernie Lombardi, Phil Rizzuto, Tommy Lasorda, Ron Santo, Joe Torre, Tony La Russa, John Smoltz, Craig Biggio, and Mike Piazza.

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Filmmaker Roberto Angotti was also the curator of the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball Exhibition from September 25, 2013 to February 1, 2014 at the Convivio Center in San Diego’s Little Italy (Design by Christopher Paluso).

As the English language editor and reporter for Federazione Italiana Baseball Softball (www.fibs.it/en), Angotti represented the Italian national teams at three international competitions in 2017: the World Baseball Classic in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; the World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) U-19 Junior Women’s World Championship in Clearwater, Florida; and the WBSC U-18 Baseball World Cup in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

When Roberto returned from the 2017 World Baseball Classic, he resolved to make a film about Italian Americans and their integral role in baseball. The National Italian American Foundation (NIAF), the Italian Sons and Daughters of America, and the Russo Brothers offered the Italian American Film Forum Grant to filmmakers wanting to share the Italian American experience. It was a natural fit so Angotti applied and was chosen as one of seven grant recipients. Later he was selected as one of three finalists invited to the 42nd Anniversary NIAF Gala Weekend in Washington, D.C., where he was proclaimed the winner and presented the Russo Brothers Italian American Film Forum Award by Italian Sons and Daughters of America President Basil Russo, National Italian American Foundation President John Viola and FOX Business Network TV Anchor/Global Markets Editor Maria Bartiromo on Saturday, November 4, 2017.

Angotti plans to make a series of Italian American baseball films. He sees his first documentary as a way to educate young Italian Americans and others on the plight of Italian immigrants, using baseball as a focal point. He said, “Italians were once second class citizens in the United States, and invisible in baseball before players like Tony Lazzeri and Joe DiMaggio rose to prominence. Not having an appreciation of your heritage is like an olive tree without roots. Baseball is a part of mine.”

Award Photo
From left to right, Italian Sons and Daughters of America President Basil Russo, Roberto Angotti, National Italian American Foundation President John Viola and FOX Business Network TV Anchor Maria Bartiromo at the NIAF 42nd Anniversary Gala in Washington, D.C. on November 4, 2017 (Photo by Andy Del Giudice)

DiMaggio’s legacy alive and well in Italy and America 100 years after the birth of Yankee Clipper Joltin’ Joe

Joe DiMaggio was born on November 25, 1914 in Martinez, California.
Italian American Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio was born in California on November 25, 1914.
Born in Martinez, California on November 25, 1914, Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio was the fourth son and eighth child born to Sicilian immigrants Giuseppe and Rosalie DiMaggio. Joe DiMaggio’s parents immigrated to America in 1898 and left behind their family in Isola delle Femmine outside of Palermo, where the DiMaggios had been fishermen for generations. Joe DiMaggio would discover his roots after retirement and visit Nettuno, the birthplace of baseball in Italy just an hour south of Rome along the Tyrrhenian Sea. Not far from Nettuno is where the historic Battle of Anzio took place, and it was there during World War II that U.S. servicemen taught Italians the game. DiMaggio’s monumental trip is reminisced in City of Baseball.

Piazza DiMaggio is located in Chicago's Little Italy.
Piazza DiMaggio is located in Chicago’s Little Italy near the Italian American Sports Hall of Fame.
Closer to home in Chicago’s Little Italy at 1431 West Taylor Street, Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio is enshrined at the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame and the neighboring Piazza DiMaggio. These must-see cultural landmarks are the pride and joy of the close-knit community that resonate the strong sense of Italian American heritage in Chicago, Illinois. Founded by George Randazzo in 1977, the immaculate National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame includes the Tommy and Jo Lasorda Exhibit Gallery, the Grand Piazza Ballroom, the Salvatore A. Balsamo Rooftop Terrace and the Frank Sinatra Performing Arts Center. Nearby Piazza DiMaggio was built in 1998 as a gift from the City of Chicago to Little Italy and features fountains, elegant columns and a very much beloved Joe DiMaggio statue.
Joe DiMaggio statue at Piazza DiMaggio in Chicago's Little Italy.
Enjoy a gelato while visiting the Joe DiMaggio statue at Piazza DiMaggio in Chicago’s Little Italy.
Joe DiMaggio's parents were considered enemy aliens during World War II and their fishing boats were seized by the U.S. Government. Ironically, Joe DiMaggio would serve in the U.S. Armed Forces.
Joe DiMaggio’s parents were Italian Nationals and were required to register as “enemy aliens” during World War II. The DiMaggio’s underwent extreme economic hardship when their fishing boats were seized by the U.S. Government. Ironically, Joe DiMaggio served in the U.S. Armed Forces while his family experienced racial discrimination at home in San Francisco, California.
Although most baseball fans read about the success Joe DiMaggio experienced on the field, rarely do they hear about the price his immigrant parents paid for a better life in America. After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States declared war and began targeting those of German, Italian or Japanese descent. The Italians were the largest immigrant group in the U.S. at the time and about 600,000 of the country’s five million Italian immigrants who had not yet naturalized were forced to register as enemy aliens. Required to carry photo ID booklets and surrender flashlights, shortwave radios, guns, binoculars, cameras and other “contraband,” Italian enemy aliens were subject to FBI raids and nightly house arrest with a curfew from 8 PM to 6 AM. Noncitizens could not travel more than five miles from home without a permit. 10,000 Italians in California were evacuated, mostly from coastal areas and sites near power plants, dams and military installations. Ironically, the half-million Italian Americans serving in the U.S. Armed Forces at the time of the crackdown were the largest ethnic group in the military. Of the 257 Italians put in internment camps for up to two years, 90 were from California. Fishing boats were seized, and thousands of fishermen lost their jobs. In San Francisco, 1,500 people–including Joe DiMaggio’s parents–were idled.
NIASHF Cover Art by Christopher Paluso
Artist Christopher Paluso’s commission piece for Joe DiMaggio was used for cover art by the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame on their official publication Red, White, and Green in 1993.
Between the Great Depression and America’s entry into World World II, people were feeling desperate and ready for a hero who personified positivity and optimism for a better future. That hero came in the form of a rising star from a poor Italian fisherman’s family. Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio became one of the most accomplished, admired and respected ballplayers of all-time as well as a true American icon. Over the course of his legendary 56-game hitting streak, the Yankee Clipper unified the country while symbolizing the potential for greatness we all yearn to see in ourselves. DiMaggio represented the true American Dream and the belief that anyone from anywhere can accomplish anything if they work hard and put their mind to it. Former President Bill Clinton eloquently said, “Joe DiMaggio, the son of Italian immigrants, gave every American something to believe in. He became the very symbol of American grace, power and skill. I have no doubt that when future generations look back at the best of America in the 20th century, they will think of the Yankee Clipper and all that he achieved.”

Chris Felix and the Reid Rizzo Foundation bring a little bit of heaven to Little Italy’s Convivio Center

Reid Rizzo in 2012 playing for the Madisonville Tradewater Pirates
The late and great Italian American Reid Rizzo photographed shortly before his passing in 2012
while playing for the Madisonville Tradewater Pirates.
The San Diego arts and Italian American communities are coming together by supporting the ongoing efforts of the Reid Rizzo Foundation in assisting pediatric heart patients and their families while meeting one of the creative forces behind the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball Exhibit at the Convivio Center in Little Italy. The annual fundraiser will take place on Saturday, January 4th when San Diego Italian American heart surgeon Dr. John Lamberti is honored for his miraculous work in saving lives and Cincinnati-based artist Chris Felix is recognized for his remarkable talent and valuable contribution to the very popular exhibition at the Convivio Center.
Renowned artist Chris Felix will be at Conivivio on Saturday, January 4th.
Meet artist Chris Felix at Conivivio on January 4th.

In addition to commenting on his illustrations of Phil Rizzuto, Joey Votto and Reid Rizzo, internationally renowned sports artist Chris Felix will deliver a fascinating multimedia presentation on Italian American baseball prospect Reid Rizzo–whose life and promising MLB career were cut short by a heart condition known as cardiomyopathy. As the former basketball and baseball coach for Rizzo, Chris has incredible insight into Reid’s inner strength and determination to live life without fear while defying the odds of competing against his peers.

Chris Felix's depiction of Cincinnati Reds' Joey Votto
Chris Felix’s depiction of Reds’ Joey Votto (2012)

Having curated “Rooted Deep In the Soil of Cincinnati…A Passion for Baseball, Art and Inspiration” at Cincinnati’s Art on the Levee Gallery, Ohio native Chris Felix is no stranger to traveling exhibitions. His artwork has been featured at the Annual Art of Baseball Exhibition at the George Krevsky Gallery in San Francisco and has graced the walls of the James Fiorentino and Friends Exhibition at the National Art Museum of Sport in Indianapolis among other places. He has been
a freelance fine artist since 1997.

"Joey Votto 2012" by Chris Felix
Chris Felix captures Cincinnati’s Joey Votto (2007).

Well-known for his acrylic sports paintings, the graduate of the College of Art Advertising in Cincinnati first received recognition for his craft as a sixth grader at
St. William School when his pencil sketch of Johnny Bench won him
a Cincinnati Reds autographed baseball in a department store’s “Draw Your Favorite Reds Player” contest. Felix’s illustrious art career has included being a graphic designer, a scenery painter for major amusement parks, and a commissioned artist for Hasbro, Warner Brothers, the Topps Card Company and the Cincinnati Reds.

Artist Chris Felix at work
Artist Chris Felix at work
Featured in sportswriter Mike Shannon’s books–“Willie Mays: Art in the Outfield” and “Coming Back to Baseball: Cincinnati Astros and the Joys of Over 30 Play”–Felix’s artwork will be included in the upcoming “Cincinnati Reds Legends” book set for release in 2015. San Diegians will have a rare appearance to meet the gifted artist at the Convivio Center (2157 N. India Street) on Saturday night, January 4th at the Reid Rizzo Foundation’s Project 144 Fundraiser. Admission is free to the public for this special event featuring Chris Felix and Dr. John Lamberti. For more information, please visit http://www.ConvivioSociety.org
By choosing an envelope at Convivio during the holidays, you support the Reid Rizzo Foundation's efforts to help heart patients and their families.
Visit Convivio during the holidays and help heart patients and their families with your donation.
Reid Rizzo had Philippians 4:13 tattooed on his bicep, which his family did not realize till after his passing and found great comfort in the passage.
Reid Rizzo had Philippians 4:13 tattooed on his bicep, which his family did not realize until after his passing. His father Tim found great comfort in the passage.
Those who cannot attend the event are encouraged to visit Convivio anytime during normal operating hours to participate in the Project 144 Fundraiser. In the spirit of giving during the holiday season, guests are encouraged to select an envelope numbered 1-144 and donate the corresponding dollar amount for a most worthy cause. Those living outside Southern California can also give to the Reid Rizzo Foundation by clicking HERE.
If you wish to mail a tax-deductible donation, make your check payable to: Reid Rizzo Foundation, P.O. Box 737, Harrison, Ohio 45030-0737.reid shadow

CBS News welcomes Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball to San Diego’s Little Italy

CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto and curator Roberto Angotti discuss baseball.
CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto and exhibit curator Roberto Angotti discuss Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball. (Photo: Donato Resta)

There was no better way to celebrate Phil Rizzuto’s birthday than in the company of San Diego’s finest news crew at CBS Channel 8 and renowned sports artist Christopher Paluso. On September 25th, CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto hosted the grand opening evening celebration of the new exhibition Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball after news reporter Shawn Styles enticed viewers to join him for local favorite Tarantino Sausages and Peroni beer during two live remote broadcasts from the Convivio Center in San Diego’s Little Italy earlier in the day.

Christopher Paluso's illustration of Joe DiMaggio is on display at San Diego's Convivio  Center.
Christopher Paluso’s illustration of Joe DiMaggio is on display through February 1st at the Convivio Center.

The capacity crowd was treated to a live performance by 11-year-old Italian American singing sensation, Isabella Shiff, who recently traveled to Italy to represent her country at the Zecchino d’Oro (Golden Sequin) International Festival of Children’s Song broadcast on Italian TV and won the solo vocalist competition in her age category. Internationally-acclaimed sports artist Christopher Paluso, whose legendary art has graced the walls of the Italian American Sports Museum in Chicago and the San Diego Hall of Champions, mesmerized the audience with nostalgic baseball stories centered around his personal interactions with Joe DiMaggio and other Italian American icons. Attendees read text panels detailing the Italian diaspora and assimilation into American society through baseball before viewing artwork from Christopher Paluso, James Fiorentino, Chris Felix, Vincent Scilla, John Giarizzo, Rob Monte, Zack D’Ulisse, Tom Richmond and Jeremy Nash in addition to photos from Tom DiPace, Rob Cuni and Robb Long.

Curator Roberto Angotti and CBS News reporter Shawn Styles share a laugh after a live interview from Convivio Center
CBS News reporter Shawn Styles and curator Roberto Angotti prepare for a live interview from Convivio. (Photo: Donato Resta)

Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball features Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Tony Lazzeri, Roy Campanella, Yogi Berra, Ernie Lombardi,
Ron Santo, Tommy Lasorda, Tony Conigliaro, Joe Garagiola, Craig Biggio, Tony La Russa, John D’Acquisto, John Montefusco, Ken Caminiti, Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto, Frank Menechino, Jason Giambi, Joey Votto, Jason Grilli, Anthony Rizzo, Nick Punto, Chris Denorfia, Drew Butera, Dan Serafini, Alex Liddi, Chris Colabello, Brian Sweeney, Mike Costanzo, and Reid Rizzo. Throughout the exhibit’s exclusive engagement at Convivio, monthly birthday celebrations will feature movies and guest speakers to honor the careers of players and coaches of Italian descent including: Lou Colabello (10/10), Chris Colabello and Sal Varriale (10/24), Nick Punto (11/8), Jason Grilli (11/11), Roy Campanella (11/19), Joe DiMaggio (11/25), Mike Scioscia (11/27), Dave Righetti (11/28), Tony Lazzeri (12/6), Mauro Mazzotti (12/12), Craig Biggio (12/14), Marco Mazzieri (12/20), John D’Aquisto (12/24), Tony Conigliaro (1/7), Jason Giambi (1/8), Kurt Bevacqua (1/23) and Dan Serafini (1/25).

Artist Christopher Paluso and CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto
Christopher Paluso stands next to his Joe Garagiola piece along with CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto.

Christopher Paluso is the official artist for the San Diego Hall of Champions Sports Museum and the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame in Chicago. His work has included many Italian American baseball players (including DiMaggio, Berra, Lasorda and Piazza) and has appeared on magazine covers, limited edition lithographs, collector plates, baseballs and in museums. Visit http://paluso4art.blogspot.com for a glimpse of his legendary artwork.

Convivio is located at 2157 India St., San Diego
Convivio is located at 2157 India St. in San Diego. http://www.ConvivioSociety.org (619) 573-4140

Support from Italian Ambassador to the U.S. Claudio Bisogniero, FIBS, Team Italia coach Mike Piazza and CBS News has given Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball a great start in San Diego. A special thank you goes out to all who have made this monumental exhibition possible and free to the public.

Dodgers’ Punto and Butera honored in San Diego at Convivio’s Italian American Baseball Exhibition

nedcollettiTried and tested as “Azzurri” teammates on Team Italy in the 2013 World Baseball Classic, utility infielder Nick Punto and backup catcher Drew Butera quite naturally bleed Dodger blue. Butera was reunited with Team Italy leadoff hitter Nick Punto when he was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers on July 31, 2013. Destined to get the most from one of MLB’s finest pitching staffs, Drew is a valuable asset to the dream team of Dodger General Manager Ned Colletti. Born on August 9, 1983, the Florida-native is the son of Sal Butera—a journeyman catcher who played 359 MLB games for the Blue Jays, Twins, Reds, Expos and Tigers from 1980-1988. Drew was selected by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2002 MLB Draft but instead opted to play college ball at the University of Central Florida (UCF). Ironically, father Sal now works as a scout for the only Canadian MLB franchise.fathersonbutera

LA's newest addition, catcher Drew Butera
Los Angeles Dodgers’ recent acquisition, star backup catcher Drew Butera will prove to be worth his weight in gold during the postseason run to the World Series.
After throwing out 48% of potential base-stealers and hitting .325 in his last season at UCF, the right-handed catcher was a fifth round pick by the New York Mets in the 2005 MLB Draft.
A big opera fan who used to listen to Andrea Bocelli and Luciano Pavarotti in the clubhouse before games while in the Mets’ minor league system, Drew was named Florida League All-Star and later promoted to Double-A ball in 2007 before being traded to the Twins—where Butera family history was made as Sal and Drew became the first father-son combination to play for Minnesota when he made his MLB debut on April 9, 2010. Known for being able
Nick Punto, Carl Pavano and Drew Butera in 2010.
Nick Punto, Carl Pavano and Drew Butera in 2010.
to handle pitches with grace rarely seen at the major league level, he became the exclusive catcher for Carl Pavano. Having a producing a calming effect on his pitching staff while calling a great game from behind the plate, Butera kept Francisco Liriano focused on every pitch which garnered the lefty a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox on May 3, 2011. Known as a pitcher’s catcher, Drew even went as far as taking the mound to throw a scoreless inning (including a strike out) against the Brewers in 2012.
Team Italy catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto
Team Italy catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto at Chase Field in Phoenix, Arizona.
Drew Butera was a big hit for Team Italy in the 2013 World Baseball Classic. Delivering a two-run home run that helped defeat Mexico and a two-run double that buried Canada. Butera was instrumental in each of Team Italy’s victories to earn the team the right to advance with Team USA to the next round of play in Miami. Dodger teammate Nick Punto was just as important in the WBC. Punto led off in every one of Team Italy’s five games and raked at the plate (.421 batting average, 8-for-19, two doubles, two walks and five runs scored). Both players along with Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Tony Lazzeri, Roy Campanella, Yogi Berra, Ernie Lombardi, Ron Santo, Tommy Lasorda, Tony Conigliaro, Craig Biggio, Tony La Russa, John D’Aquisto, Ken Caminiti, Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto, Joey Votto, Jason Grilli, Anthony Rizzo, Chris Denorfia, Dan Serafini, Alex Liddi, Chris Colabello, Brian Sweeney, Mike Costanzo and Reid Rizzo are featured in the Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball Exhibit at Convivio, 2157 India Street in San Diego. Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball showcases original artwork, photographs, uniforms, articles, and other related artifacts related to baseball players of Italian descent and those with strong ties to San Diego. Works by nenowned Italian American artists Christopher Paluso, James Fiorentino, Vincent Scilla, Professor John Giarrizzo, Warren Reed, Zack D’Ulisse, and Rob Monte will be on display alongside sports artists Chris Felix, Vernon Wells, Jr., and Jeremy Nash at the Little Italy Heritage Museum at Convivio Center. For more information on the exhibit and special events–including player and artist appearances, visit www.ConvivioSociety.org or phone 619-573-4140.
Drew Butera has been known to surprise pitchers with his pop at the plate.
LA Dodgers’ catcher Drew Butera has been known to surprise pitchers with his pop at the plate.

Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball Exhibit in San Diego’s Little Italy remembers Reid Rizzo

Lake Erie's Reid Rizzo in 2012
Lake Erie’s Reid Rizzo in 2012
Everybody has heard about Chicago Cubs slugger Anthony Rizzo and Washington Nationals President Mike Rizzo, but it’s never too late to learn about the legacy of Italian American Reid Rizzo. If it had not been for renowned sports artist Chris Felix, most baseball lovers would have never have known about the impact that Reid Rizzo had on so many lives. Having been commissioned by the Topps Card Company to do 10 paintings for the 2010 National Chicle Baseball Card set, which included the Cincinnati-based artist’s illustration of New York Yankees legend Phil Rizzuto, the similarities between “Scooter” and Reid Rizzo were evident. Both shortstops overcame their small physical attributes to become extraordinary athletes. When Chris Felix was asked to contribute his classic Rizzuto painting to the Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball Exhibit at Convivio Center in San Diego, he suggested that Rizzo–a player who refused to give
After his sophomore year at Lake Erie College, Reid Rizzo died peacefully in his sleep.
After setting single-season records as a Lake Erie College sophomore, the life and MLB dreams of 21-year-old Reid Rizzo were tragically cut short from his cardiomyopathy.
up on his major league dreams–be included as well.
Southern California baseball fans attending the grand opening and Phil Rizzuto birthday celebration on September 25th at Convivio will be pleasantly surprised that the Chris Felix collection includes Phil Rizzuto, Joey Votto and Reid Rizzo. Felix knew Rizzo was something special early on since he been Reid’s baseball coach for nearly for a decade. As a three-month-old infant, Rizzo’s parents received catastrophic news that their newborn son had been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, a life-threatening heart condition. Despite doctors telling the Rizzo family that he would never be able to run, ride a bike, or play sports, Reid defied the odds by playing baseball, football, basketball and hockey. As a freshman at La Salle High School in Cincinnati, he became one of the youngest players in history to earn a starting position on the varsity baseball team.
Artisit Chris Felix (left) at a Reid Rizzo Foundation fundraiser.
Chris Felix (left) signed and donated his original prints to benefit the Reid Rizzo Foundation.
Chris Felix's painting of Reid Rizzo
Chris Felix’s acrylic painting of Reid Rizzo
College scouts recruited one of La Salle’s all-time athletic heroes, and Rizzo received a baseball scholarship to Lake Erie College in Painesville, Ohio. Just one month after completing a stellar sophomore campaign as the Storm’s starting shortstop and beginning Summer League play with the Madisonville Tradewater Pirates, Reid peacefully passed away in his sleep. Rizzo was an organ donor so his heart was donated to the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Heart Institute for medical research. Reid accomplished all of his success without anyone outside of his family knowing that he was living with cardiomyopathy. Lake Erie College coach Brian McGee eulogized: “Reid lived life and played the game the right way. No matter what pitches life threw at Reid, he took his hacks, no matter how much pressure he faced in a day, he always came through in the clutch, no matter how dominating the situation was, he never feared
Reid Rizzo wore #4 while at La Salle.
Reid Rizzo wore #4 while at La Salle.
failure, never backed down from the opposition, and persevered through any challenge in life. He lived with tenacity, passion, confidence, toughness, and compassion. That is remarkable about his life. He carried all emotions with him and wore them on his sleeve. He didn’t care what others thought. He did what he felt in his heart was right. He did things for himself and his loved ones. He never tried to live his life for the acceptance of others. He lived his life so he could accept himself. He lived with such a passion for life, never letting the day go by without taking advantage of its opportunities.” Artist and family friend Chris Felix said, “He was more concerned about his family’s well-being than his own. He never let his family nor anyone else feel sorry for what he had to endure during his 21 years of life. Reid’s dream was to play Major League Baseball and coach one day. He is remembered for his
La Salle All-Star Reid Rizzo
La Salle All-Star shortstop Reid Rizzo
uncanny ability to make everyone feel special. Reid’s spirit lives on in each of those who knew him and in those who believe that all things are possible through Christ. Reid’s tattoos inspire many to live their lives to the fullest. His belief in family and his desire to be a positive role model for his younger sister and others exemplify who Reid was as a human being. Those who knew him believe his story to be inspirational.” Shortly after Reid’s passing, a few of his former coaches at La Salle High School decided to form a committee and hold a baseball tournament in Reid’s honor.
The idea blossomed into the creation of the Reid Rizzo Foundation. Since then, there have been
many successful fundraising events including an annual Reid Rizzo Day at the Reds’ Great American Ballpark. The Reid Rizzo Foundation was established to remember and honor the character, courage, strength, and vigor of Reid Rizzo. rrfoundation
The nonprofit’s goals include: provide financial assistance to those seeking to enhance their primary or secondary educational experience; enhance education, awareness and research relative to medical conditions that affect the cardiovascular system; and support athletic organizations wishing to enhance the support structure provided for the athletes they service. By clicking HERE, you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Reid Rizzo Foundation.

Chris Felix will be featured in the Artists' Tribute to Italian American Baseball Exhibit in San Diego's Little Italy beginning September 25th.
Chris Felix will be featured in the Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball at Convivio Center in San Diego beginning September 25th.
Artists’ Tribute to Italian American Baseball showcases original artwork, photographs, articles, uniforms, and other autographed one-of-a-kind artifacts. The exhibit officially opens to the public on Phil Rizzuto’s birthday, Wednesday, September 25th with a special 7 pm screening on Convivio’s big screen of Yankeeography, Volume Two featuring Phil “Scooter” Rizzuto. In addition to birthday cake being served to all attendees, baseball fans will have their first opportunity to see Chris Felix’s masterfully-crafted depiction of Phil Rizzuto as well as that of MLB All-Star Joey Votto and never-to-be-forgotten Reid Rizzo. Other notable artists participating in the exhibition include James Fiorentino, Vincent Scilla, John Giarrizzo, Vernon Wells Jr., Tom Richmond, Jeremy Nash, Rob Monte, and Zack D’Ulisse. The Convivio Center is located at 2157 India Street in San Diego. Call (619) 573-4140 for more information or click HERE for an updated calendar.LittleItalySD