The Italian American Baseball Family Tree Grows

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The Italian American Baseball Family is on a mission to strengthen Team Italia and its fan base.

In late 1976 Lou Colabello got an invitation he could not refuse from friend Ed Orizzi, who was looking for a pitcher to help Rimini compete in the Italian Baseball League. It didn’t take long for the left-handed ace from the University of Massachusetts Amherst to regain his pitching form last seen in the 1969 College World Series to lead Rimini to three Italian Series A titles from 1977 to 1984. Putting together a stellar 94-25 record with a 2.99 ERA, the owners of the other IBL teams did not want to see Colabello’s dominance any longer. As a result, the president of the league and owner of the team in Parma implemented a rule that barred American-schooled Italians over the age of 26 from pitching.

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Italian American Lou Colabello pitched for Team Italia against USA at Dodger Stadium in the 1984 Olympics.

After meeting the love of his life Silvana in Rimini and getting married to her in 1981, the Italian American Baseball Family Tree grew its first branch with the birth of their son Chris Colabello in 1983. Lou was invited to play for the Italian national team in 1984, when he would pitch against USA’s Barry Larkin, Will Clark, Shane Mack, Oddibe McDowell, Mark McGwire, Cory Snyder and B.J. Surhoff at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

american_italian_roots_postcards-r9c2297463d664483b6c6ab48f30d9bd1_vgbaq_8byvr_512 Fast forward to the first pitch of the 2013 World Baseball Classic warm-up game between Team Italia and the Los Angeles Angels. Halos skipper Mike Scioscia looked out at the sea of Azzurri jerseys and said, “I’m proud to be Italian, and I think everyone on that field is proud of their roots and where they come from.” Then Scioscia asked, “Where’s Sal?” He wanted to know where Sal Varriale was. Sal was the first “oriundo” or immigrant with Italian ancestry recruited by Aldo Notari, the former Italian Baseball Federation President from 1985 to 2000. The Brooklyn native enjoyed a successful playing career in Italy and coached Team Italia in the Olympics from 1992 to 2004.

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Sal Varriale (left) was given the Meritorious Service Award and Mike Scioscia (right) was given the Rawlings Honor Award by the American Baseball Coaches Association at the 2012 ABCA Convention.

Today Sal proudly serves as Director of Parma Baseball and as an international scout for the Cincinnati Reds. The Italian American Baseball Family Roots grew during Notari’s tenure governing the Italian Baseball Federation and it continues to prosper with the addition of MLB’s World Baseball Classic under new president Andrea MarconMike Piazza was recruited by former president Riccardo Fraccari to join Team Italia while visiting Italy in 2002. Jason Grilli and Frank Catalanotto also signed up to play for Team Italia in the 2006 WBC.

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After playing in the 2006 World Baseball Classic, Hall of Famer Mike Piazza became Team Italia’s hitting coach.

With Mike Piazza signing on as Team Italia hitting coach for the 2009 World Baseball Classic in Toronto, many notable Italian American MLB players contributed to Team Italia’s surprise 6-2 upset over host Canada. Chris Denorfia went 4-for-4 with three doubles, two runs, two RBI and played great defense. Starting pitcher Dan Serafini picked up the win after middle reliever Chris Cooper kept hitters off balance and closer Jason Grilli secured the 3 1/3 inning save. New Italian American Baseball Family members included Nick Punto, Francisco Cervelli, Adam Ottavino, and Mike Costanzo.

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Chris Colabello and Anthony Rizzo celebrate Italian style after Colabello’s three-run homer against the Dominican Republic in the 2013 World Baseball Classic.

After Team Italia defeated Mexico and Canada to advance to the second-round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic, they would suffer a 5-4 loss to eventual 2013 WBC Champion Dominican Republic and demonstrate how its mixed roster of Italian-born players like Alex Liddi and Alessandro Maestri and Italian American MLB-affiliated newcomers Anthony Rizzo, Chris Colabello, Drew Butera and Pat Venditte could compete with international baseball’s elite.

Drew Butera and Frank Catalanotto
Team Italia catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto at the 2013 World Baseball Classic
Chicago Cubs catching prospect Alberto Mineo was signed in 2010.
Chicago Cubs catching prospect Alberto Mineo was signed in 2010.

Los Angeles radio deejay and journalist Roberto Angotti could see the writing on the wall and knew something special was happening when he was invited to the Italian Baseball Academy in Tirrenia while visiting family nearby in 2012. Since the day Federazione Italiana Baseball Softball (FIBS) Academy director and Chicago Cubs scout Bill Holmberg signed Italian Baseball Academy graduate Alberto Mineo to the Cubbies in 2010, MLB scouts have scattered around the FIBS-sponsored Baseball Academy like flies hunting down the scent of the next big European prospect. Germany’s most successful player to date–Max Kepler, a product of a similar European Baseball Academy that MLB’s Bill Holmberg frequents in Regensburg and recipient of the Minnesota Twins’ $800,000 signing bonus in 2009, proved to be worth his weight in gold based on his 17 homers and 63 RBI during the 2016 MLB season.

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Italian MLB Academy Director Bill Holmberg (far right) smiles as prospect Marten Gasparini signs a pro baseball contract with the Kansas City Royals in 2013.

San Remo native Alex Liddi, who signed to the Seattle Mariners in 2005 and made his MLB debut in 2011, was inspirational for young Italian ballplayers like Marten Gasparini who dreamed of playing in the Big Leagues. Heralded as the best 5-tool player ever out of Europe, FIBS Academy graduate and MLB prospect Marten Gasparini received a $1.3 million dollar signing bonus from the Kansas City Royals in 2013. The 19-year-old shortstop credits Italian Baseball Academy director and Team Italia coach Bill Holmberg for his success.

Manager Marco Mazzieri led underdog Team Italia to the second round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic.
Manager Marco Mazzieri led underdog Team Italia to the second round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic.

Team Italia manager Marco Mazzieri has been synonymous with Italian baseball since his playing days in the 1980’s. During his ten-year tenure as the leader of the Team Italia coaching staff, Mazzieri has made the Italians proud with European Baseball Championship titles in 2010 and 2012. The LA Dodgers recruited Mazzieri to become their scout in 2013. Mazzieri went right to work and wasted no time in signing FIBS Academy graduates Federico Celli and Federico Giordani.

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Courtesy of Italian American Family member/artist Christopher Paluso 

Growing up in Los Angeles as a first generation Italian American Dodgers fan, Roberto Angotti understood the strong connection between Tommy Lasorda and Mike Piazza. From the moment Piazza decided to play for Team Italia in the 2006 WBC, Angotti enlisted to become a soldier on the frontline of the Italian baseball revolution. Roberto became friends with Mike during the two weeks Team Italia spent in Phoenix preparing for the 2013 WBC. When Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda dropped in on Team Italia’s practice at Dodgers’ Spring Training Camp in Glendale to address the team, Angotti pledged his support and worked tirelessy behind-the-scenes to provide daily journals of the team’s activities. Lasorda’s emotionally-driven speech coupled with Piazza’s serious commitment inspired Angotti to share the experience with others through a traveling exhibit paying tribute to Italian American baseball entitled Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball. The exhibition featured sports artists of Italian descent–including James Fiorentino–and paid homage to Team Italia.

MLB Executive VP of Baseball Operations Joe Torre and James Fiorentino
MLB Executive VP of Baseball Operations Joe Torre and Italian American Baseball Family’s James Fiorentino

Featured in the New York Times as well as on ESPN, MSG, and FOX, James Fiorentino is considered one of the world’s best sports artists. Fiorentino became the youngest artist to ever be featured in the National Baseball Hall of Fame at age 15 with his portrait of Reggie Jackson. Art seen at JamesFiorentino.com grace the walls of the National Basketball and Cycling Hall of Fames, Ted Williams and Roberto Clemente Museums, National Art Museum of Sport and the Sports Museum of America.

Italian American Baseball Family's Joe Quagliano and Mike Piazza hold James Fiorentino's portrait of the Hall of Famer.
Italian American Baseball Family’s Joe Quagliano presents Mike Piazza a portrait commemorating his induction to the National Baseball of Hall of Fame by world-renowed artist James Fiorentino.

new-logo-fibs The Italian American Baseball Family grew organically when Mint Pros founder Joe Quagliano reached out to Team Italia manager Marco Mazzieri and offered his expertise as a pro sports event promoter to raise funds for baseball development in Italy. With the support of FIBS executives Riccardo Fraccari, Marinella Mojoli, Massimo Fochi, Marco Landi and Riccardo Schiroli, Quagliano represented the Italian Baseball Federation with Marco Mazzieri at the National Italian American Foundation 41st Anniversary Gala and joined Mike Piazza at the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame 39th Annual Induction & Awards Gala.

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The first annual IBAF/FIBS fundraising event sold out in no time upon its initial announcement.
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The Italian American Baseball Family’s mission includes providing scholarships for athletes at FIBS Academy, a residential program in Italy.

Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto,
Joe Quagliano, James Fiorentino and Roberto Angotti have teamed up for the Italian American Baseball Family Launch and Dinner, the first of many fundraisers to assist in the development of youth baseball in Italy by building and maintaining ball fields, purchasing uniforms and equipment, organizing clinics and supporting FIBS. Like branches on a tree, we grow in different directions yet our Italian family roots remain the same.

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Italian American Baseball Family goes to bat for FIBS and recent earthquake relief efforts in Italia

Drew Butera and Frank Catalanotto
Team Italia catcher Drew Butera and coach Frank Catalanotto at the 2013 WBC in Phoenix.
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Visit the newly improved FIBS/Team Italia website.

Italia coach Frank Catalanotto, Mint Pros‘ Joe Quagliano, and National Baseball Hall of Fame artist James Fiorentino are hosts of a special fundraising event to benefit Federazione Italiana Baseball Softball (FIBS) and Italian earthquake relief as well as honor Team Italia in the 2017 World Baseball Classic on December 8th at Carmine’s Restaurant and Sports Bar in Brooklyn, New York. FIBS president Riccardo Fraccari and Team Italia manager Marco Mazzieri are among the honorary guests scheduled to appear. New York Mets announcer and National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame supporter Wayne Randazzo will emcee.

Yogi Berra and James Fiorentino
Italian American icon Yogi Berra and James Fiorentino at age 15

Among other memorable moments, the family of Yogi Berra will be presented with the late Italian American’s retired number 8 Italia coaches jersey from 2008, and internationally acclaimed artist James Fiorentino will honor Team Italia hitting coach Mike Piazza by revealing his commissioned portrait of the 2016 National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee during the dinner ceremonies. All fundraising dinner proceeds will support youth baseball in Italy by building and maintaining ball fields, purchase uniforms and equipment, organize clinics and other youth baseball programs under FIBS’ guidance.

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James Fiorentino’s “Mike Piazza ‘53” was made in 1999 but shows Piazza as he may have appeared in the 1953 Topps set (incidentally before the NY Mets existed).

Mike Piazza met FIBS president Riccardo Fraccari in 2002 while visiting Italy on a MLB International mission to help grow the game in Europe. Fraccari asked Piazza if he would be interested in representing Italy in international competition, and the proud Italian American responded that it would be privilege to play for the Italian national team in honor of his Sicilian ancestry. University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee professor emeritus of Italian Lawrence Baldassaro-who served as the interpreter for Team Italia at the 2006 WBC–said, “Of all the younger Major League players I interviewed for my book, Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball, none was more in touch with, and interested in, his Italian heritage than Mike Piazza. And his commitment to baseball in Italy is unmatched among those his age.” In response Mike Piazza replied, “We just want to continue to draw attention to the fact that we believe baseball is marketable in Italy. We think it’s viable. We think there’s a lot of upward growth. We can produce players over there. I’m convinced of it.”

Carmine and Sons
Support the Italian baseball revolution by purchasing a ticket to the fundraising dinner on December 8th at Carmine’s Restaurant and Sports Bar in Brooklyn, NY.

Carmine Gangone has been slinging pizza at his family’s Williamsburg restaurant in Brooklyn since he was 7 years old. Carmine’s Pizzeria was opened nearly four decades ago by his hard-working Italian immigrant father from Salerno. Carmine’s Restaurant and Sports Bar has since become a favorite New York Yankees enclave with its enormous display of Brooklyn Bombers memorabilia, which most notably includes Italian American baseball legend Joe DiMaggio. Carmine’s Restaurant and Sports Bar plays host to the Italian American Baseball Family Launch and Fundraiser Dinner on December 8th. Team Italia coaches Mike Piazza and Frank Catalanotto, Team Italia players Jason Grilli and Francisco Cervelli as well as other MLB players including Mike Napoli are expected. For tickets and more information about this special event, click HEREMike Piazza Flyer Outlined copy

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SPONSORSHIP LEVELS
SINGLE
1 ticket to the Team Italia event
1 giclee signed by sports artist James Fiorentino
Your name displayed in our event program
$1,000
 
DOUBLE
2 tickets to the Team Italia fundraising event,
1 Mike Piazza – 16 x 20 giclees signed by sports artist James Fiorentino
Your company’s ¼ page ad displayed in ours event program.
Pre event meeting with the celebrities
$2,000
 
TRIPLE
4 tickets to the Team Italia fundraising event,
2 Mike Piazza – 16 x 20 giclees signed by sports artist James Fiorentino
Your company’s ½ page ad displayed in ours event program.
Pre event meeting with the celebrities
2 Field passes for batting practice and 2 field level seats for a 2016 or 2017 NY Mets game
$5,000
 
HOME RUN
10 tickets to the Team Italia fundraising event,
10 Mike Piazza – 16 x 20 giclees signed by sports artist James Fiorentino
Your company’s full page ad in our event program.
Pre event meeting with the celebrities
4 Field passes for batting practice and 4 field level seats for a 2016 or 2017 NY Mets game
$10,000
 
GRAND SLAM
15 tickets to the Team Italia fundraising event,
15 Mike Piazza – 16 x 20 giclees signed by sports artist James Fiorentino
Your company’s name displayed on the back page of ours event program.
Pre event meeting with the celebrities
6 Field passes for batting practice and 6 field level seats for a 2016 or 2017 NY Mets game
$15,000

 

Team Italia closer Jason Grilli integral in bringing 2016 World Series Championship north of border to Toronto

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39-year-old Jason Grilli is better than ever in Toronto.

Just ask former Jays manager Cito Gaston about the current team’s roster, which now boasts veteran Italian American pitcher Jason Grilli as their reliable setup man. Just two games out of first in the American League East Division, the Blue Jays would like nothing more than ending the 23-year-old drought by bringing a World Series title back home to Toronto. Gaston said, “I think they have the team to win it. It’s going to be fun, and it’s going to be fun for this city to watch.” Since being traded on May 31st from the Atlanta Braves, Jason Grilli has provided the necessary leadership to propel current Toronto Blue Jays skipper John Gibbons’ team to the top.

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Proud Italian American and Floridian Jason Grilli

The trade that brought Grilli north of the border probably would have never taken place without a little help from Blue Jays catcher Russell Martin, who encouraged the front office to take action and served as catcher for Grilli while with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2013 when Jason earned a nod to the National League All-Star squad. Like a fine Italian wine getting better with time, Grilli saved 33 games and posted a 2.70 ERA with 74 strikeouts to just 13 walks for the Pirates that year. His accolades grew larger in 2014 when the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame honored Pirates closer Jason Grilli as the “Man of the Year”. Jays General Manager Ross Atkins cited Martin’s endorsement of Grilli as being a factor in bringing him to Toronto.

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Pitcher Jason Grilli and catcher Russell Martin have reunited to bring another World Series title to Canada.

Martin admitted Grilli is now getting by more on craft and guile than power. “His arm is still electric. There’s still some bullets in that thing,” Russell said. “He’s got that fastball that guys like to swing at when it’s up in the zone. He knows how to disrupt timing with the slide-step, how to elevate the fastball. And he’s got a really tight slider — one of the best that I’ve caught.” Jason has made fifteen appearances for Toronto, tossing 13.2 innings, allowing ten hits and six walks while striking out 23. Grilli has also notched four holds since joining the Blue Jays.

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The Blue Jays won the World Series in 1992 and 1993.

After Grilli was traded to the Angels from the Pirates in 2014, Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle said: “I know this about Jason. Every time a new opportunity has come to him, he has been able to find another gear.” Based on his performance for the past six weeks, Jason has indeed found a new lease on life in Toronto–thanks in part to the recruitment efforts of Canadian-born Russell Martin, who would love matching World Series rings. “I thanked him and up down,” Grilli said of Martin. “I told him I knew he had something to do with me being over here.”

‘Tis the season for HOF’s Mike Piazza and La Befana

NIASHF Only second to Santa in holiday appearances, National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame spokesman Mike Piazza began early before Thanksgiving when he emceed NIASHF’s 37th Annual Awards Celebration and inducted John Andretti, Babe Parilli, Scott Pioli, Angelo Pizzo and Frank Zamboni at the InterContinental Hotel in Chicago.

Mike Piazza's popularity in Italy is second only Venezia's Santa Clause.
Mike Piazza’s popularity in Italia comes a close second to St. Nick but nobody can touch La Befana.

International baseball ambassador and Italian National team hitting coach Mike Piazza got a jump start on Babbo Natale, otherwise known as Father Christmas, when he traveled to Veneto, Italy last January to speak to an enthusiastic audience at the 29th Annual Coaches Convention. Piazza said, “We all overteach and overanalyze hitting. Everyone has their own opinion, but in actuality–just as Ted Williams explained in his book–The Science of Hitting–the number one rule is to get a good ball to hit. Gaining an understanding of the strike zone and what you can and can’t hit is the key. Simply spoken, you can’t hit what you can’t see.” Borrowing a page straight out of Ted Williams’ book, Rudolph the red nose reindeer leads Cometa, Ballerina, Fulmine, Donnola, Freccia, Saltarello, Donato, and Cupido so that Babbo Natale is able to see which homes to hit and deliver presents to millions of Italian children every year. However, La Befana, the elderly woman who delivers gifts on Epiphany Eve (January 5th), is a cultural folklore tradition favorite and reigns as the undisputed Italian holiday champion.

La Befana is one of Italy's oldest and most celebrated legends.
La Befana is one of Italy’s oldest and most celebrated legends.

La Befana is a nice old woman who some believe takes flight on her broom stick every year in the middle of the night in preparation of the arrival of Epiphany day on January 6th. She showers children with gifts to reward them for their good behavior. La Befana’s big sack on her back and basket is usually full of sweets and chocolates, which will make their way into the stockings of kids who have behaved on the day of the Epiphany. However, those children who didn’t do what they were asked by their parents and were naughty throughout the year will end up with a stocking full of lumps of coal. Yet, everyone loves La Befana. She is sometimes portrayed as having white or black hair with a long crooked nose, broken shoes and a patched dress. Unlike in America where children generally leave milk and cookies for Santa Claus, it is customary to have a nice glass of red wine waiting for La Befana upon her arrival to your house considering the long overnight journey she had to endure getting there.

Some believe the Mike Piazza soccer jersey handed out at Italian Heritage Night at Citi Field may have been the best Mets giveaway of all-time.
Attendees of Italian Heritage Night at Citi Field received a Mike Piazza soccer jersey to the delight the Azzurri.

Mike Piazza deserves more than just chianti for the seemingly endless journey he has had to experience to become enshrined in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The Mets Hall of Famer is a fan favorite, and anytime he is affiliated with a night at the ballpark it is an instant hit. The Mike Piazza soccer jersey giveaway at the 2014 Italian Heritage Night at Citi Field was considered to be best Mets promotion of the season.

Mike Piazza appears in a Norelco commercial.
Mike Piazza featured in Philips Norelco commercial

Commercial endorsements from Philips Norelco as well as special guest interview appearances on Complex News and TMZ Sports are just the tip of the iceberg of mass media that has spotlighted Mike Piazza recently. Expect nothing less than an avalanche of additional coverage in 2015 to follow with Piazza’s support of the National Italian American Foundation and the NIAF 40th Anniversary Gala.

Mike Piazza and friends at the National Italian American Foundation Gala
Mike Piazza and the Hollywood crowd at the NIAF Gala
Author and University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Emeritus Professor Lawrence A. Baldassaro summed up why this blogger believes Mike Piazza is Italian American of the Decade when he wrote: “Of all the younger Major League players I interviewed for my book, Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball, none was more in touch with, and interested in, his Italian heritage than Mike Piazza. And his commitment to baseball in Italy is unmatched among those his age.”

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DiMaggio’s legacy alive and well in Italy and America 100 years after the birth of Yankee Clipper Joltin’ Joe

Joe DiMaggio was born on November 25, 1914 in Martinez, California.
Italian American Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio was born in California on November 25, 1914.
Born in Martinez, California on November 25, 1914, Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio was the fourth son and eighth child born to Sicilian immigrants Giuseppe and Rosalie DiMaggio. Joe DiMaggio’s parents immigrated to America in 1898 and left behind their family in Isola delle Femmine outside of Palermo, where the DiMaggios had been fishermen for generations. Joe DiMaggio would discover his roots after retirement and visit Nettuno, the birthplace of baseball in Italy just an hour south of Rome along the Tyrrhenian Sea. Not far from Nettuno is where the historic Battle of Anzio took place, and it was there during World War II that U.S. servicemen taught Italians the game. DiMaggio’s monumental trip is reminisced in City of Baseball.

Piazza DiMaggio is located in Chicago's Little Italy.
Piazza DiMaggio is located in Chicago’s Little Italy near the Italian American Sports Hall of Fame.
Closer to home in Chicago’s Little Italy at 1431 West Taylor Street, Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio is enshrined at the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame and the neighboring Piazza DiMaggio. These must-see cultural landmarks are the pride and joy of the close-knit community that resonate the strong sense of Italian American heritage in Chicago, Illinois. Founded by George Randazzo in 1977, the immaculate National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame includes the Tommy and Jo Lasorda Exhibit Gallery, the Grand Piazza Ballroom, the Salvatore A. Balsamo Rooftop Terrace and the Frank Sinatra Performing Arts Center. Nearby Piazza DiMaggio was built in 1998 as a gift from the City of Chicago to Little Italy and features fountains, elegant columns and a very much beloved Joe DiMaggio statue.
Joe DiMaggio statue at Piazza DiMaggio in Chicago's Little Italy.
Enjoy a gelato while visiting the Joe DiMaggio statue at Piazza DiMaggio in Chicago’s Little Italy.
Joe DiMaggio's parents were considered enemy aliens during World War II and their fishing boats were seized by the U.S. Government. Ironically, Joe DiMaggio would serve in the U.S. Armed Forces.
Joe DiMaggio’s parents were Italian Nationals and were required to register as “enemy aliens” during World War II. The DiMaggio’s underwent extreme economic hardship when their fishing boats were seized by the U.S. Government. Ironically, Joe DiMaggio served in the U.S. Armed Forces while his family experienced racial discrimination at home in San Francisco, California.
Although most baseball fans read about the success Joe DiMaggio experienced on the field, rarely do they hear about the price his immigrant parents paid for a better life in America. After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States declared war and began targeting those of German, Italian or Japanese descent. The Italians were the largest immigrant group in the U.S. at the time and about 600,000 of the country’s five million Italian immigrants who had not yet naturalized were forced to register as enemy aliens. Required to carry photo ID booklets and surrender flashlights, shortwave radios, guns, binoculars, cameras and other “contraband,” Italian enemy aliens were subject to FBI raids and nightly house arrest with a curfew from 8 PM to 6 AM. Noncitizens could not travel more than five miles from home without a permit. 10,000 Italians in California were evacuated, mostly from coastal areas and sites near power plants, dams and military installations. Ironically, the half-million Italian Americans serving in the U.S. Armed Forces at the time of the crackdown were the largest ethnic group in the military. Of the 257 Italians put in internment camps for up to two years, 90 were from California. Fishing boats were seized, and thousands of fishermen lost their jobs. In San Francisco, 1,500 people–including Joe DiMaggio’s parents–were idled.
NIASHF Cover Art by Christopher Paluso
Artist Christopher Paluso’s commission piece for Joe DiMaggio was used for cover art by the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame on their official publication Red, White, and Green in 1993.
Between the Great Depression and America’s entry into World World II, people were feeling desperate and ready for a hero who personified positivity and optimism for a better future. That hero came in the form of a rising star from a poor Italian fisherman’s family. Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio became one of the most accomplished, admired and respected ballplayers of all-time as well as a true American icon. Over the course of his legendary 56-game hitting streak, the Yankee Clipper unified the country while symbolizing the potential for greatness we all yearn to see in ourselves. DiMaggio represented the true American Dream and the belief that anyone from anywhere can accomplish anything if they work hard and put their mind to it. Former President Bill Clinton eloquently said, “Joe DiMaggio, the son of Italian immigrants, gave every American something to believe in. He became the very symbol of American grace, power and skill. I have no doubt that when future generations look back at the best of America in the 20th century, they will think of the Yankee Clipper and all that he achieved.”

Why Mike Piazza is Italian American of the Decade

Mike Piazza prior to the start of the 2006 World Baseball Classic in Lakeland, Florida.
After playing for Team Italia in the 2006 WBC,
Mike Piazza became the country’s hitting coach.
Future Hall of Famer Mike Piazza has been fueling the fire of the Italian baseball revolution for nearly a decade. Since joining Team Italia in the 2006 World Baseball Classic, the proud Italian American has had a profound effect on the growth and development of baseball in Italy. Working in tandem with Italian MLB Academy Director and Team Italia pitching coach Bill Holmberg, Piazza has helped Italy become the superpower of European baseball in light of the recent KC Royals signing of five-tool Italian-born prospect Marten Gasparini for $1.3 million.
Italian MLB Academy Director Bill Holmberg (far right) smiles as Kansas City Royals prospect Marten Gasparini signs his professional baseball contract.
Kansas City Royals prospect Marten Gasparini signs his $1.3 professional baseball contract
while Italian MLB Academy Director and Team Italia coach Bill Holmberg (far right) looks on.
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MIke Piazza was inducted into the Mets' Hall of Fame on September 29, 2013.
Mike Piazza was inducted into the Mets’ Hall of Fame on September 29, 2013.
One statistic often overlooked in validating Mike Piazza’s rightful place in the Baseball Hall of Fame is Career Runs Created by a catcher. Based on the 1,378 Runs Created by Piazza–which ties Hall of Famer Carlton Fisk–Team Italia’s hitting coach was the BEST hitting catcher of all-time (Mike Piazza 1,378; Carlton Fisk 1,378; Ted Simmons 1,283; Yogi Berra 1,265; Joe Torre 1,259; Johnny Bench 1,239; Gary Carter 1,184; Bill Dickey 1,164; Gabby Hartnett 1,161 and Jason Kendall 1,112). Defensively Piazza was the BEST catcher of his time in handling his pitchers. In his career behind the plate, pitchers had a 3.80 ERA when he was catching. Checking the stats for all the other catchers who caught the same pitchers in the same year that Piazza did, they allowed a 4.34 ERA. With 12-time MLB All-Star Mike Piazza coaching Italian ballplayers, the BEST has yet to come for Team Italia.

18-year-old Chicago Cubs catching prospect Alberto Mineo during Team Italia's recent visit to Dodgertown in Vero Beach, Florida. (Photo by  )
19-year-old catching prospect Alberto Mineo, who signed for $500,000 with the Chicago Cubs, was under the guidance and direction of mentor Mike Piazza during Team Italia’s 2014 Spring Training Exhibition Series at Dodgertown in Vero Beach, Florida. (Photo by Claudio Vecchi)

Tommy Lasorda and Team Italy hitting coach Mike Piazza (Photo by Jon SooHoo/LA Dodgers)
Team Italia hitting coach Mike Piazza and legend Tommy Lasorda (Photo by Jon SooHoo/LA Dodgers)
“We just want to continue to draw attention to the fact that we believe baseball is marketable in Italy. We think it’s viable. We think there’s a lot of upward growth. We can produce players over there. I’m convinced of it,” said Piazza. 17-year-old switch-hitting shortstop Marten Gasparini–compared to a young Derek Jeter–and 19-year-old lefthanded-hitting catcher Alberto Mineo lead the charge of the Italian baseball revolution spurred by Dodgers scout/Team Italia manager Marco Mazzieri and coaches Holmberg and Piazza.

Italian Americans Sal Varriale and Mike Piazza at the 29th Annual Italian Coaches Convention in January 2014.
Italian Americans Sal Varriale and Mike Piazza at the 29th Annual Italian Coaches Convention
Mike Piazza’s “Science of Hitting” was a highlight at
the 29th Annual Coaches Convention in Veneto, Italy.
International baseball ambassador Mike Piazza traveled to Veneto, Italy recently to speak to an enthusiastic audience at the 29th Annual Coaches Convention. Piazza said, “We all overteach and overanalyze hitting. Everyone has their own opinion, but in actuality–just as Ted Williams explained in his book The Science of Hitting--the number one rule is to get a good ball to hit. Gaining an understanding of the strike zone and what you can and can’t hit is the key. Simply spoken, you can’t hit what you can’t see.” fibs_logo Twelve years ago in 2002 Piazza met FIBS President Riccardo Fraccari while visiting Italy on a MLB International mission to help the game develop in Europe. Fraccari asked Piazza if he would be interested in representing Italy in international competition, and the proud Italian American responded that it would be privilege to play for the Italian national team in honor of his Sicilian ancestry. During a 2006 World Baseball Classic press conference, Piazza addressed reporters who questioned why he chose to join Team Italia and said, “You may not understand it, but for Italian Americans getting a chance to finally play for Italy is like a duck chick getting close to the water for the first time.”
Team Italia pitcher Alessandro Maestri had much success playing in Japan.
After reaching Double-A ball in the Chicago Cubs organization, Team Italia pitcher Alessandro Maestri ventured abroad and had great success in Australia and Japan.
Alex Liddi carrying the Italian flag while ascending up the MLB ranks in 2008
Alex Liddi has carried the Italian flag from the minute he signed with the Mariners in 2005 until now playing for the White Sox.
The Italians have since fared well in the World Baseball Classic, nearly upsetting 2013 WBC Champion Dominican Republic and runner-up Puerto Rico. Piazza’s influence swayed Cubs’ slugger Anthony Rizzo to play for Team Italia alongside other MLB Italian Americans including Padres’ Chris Denorfia, A’s Nick Punto, Twins’ Chris Colabello and Pirates’ Jason Grilli. Piazza’s power of persuasion even impacted the Team Italia coaching staff as former MLB journeyman Frank Catalanotto joined the Italian baseball revolution. Team Italia’s homegrown talent held its own and contributed to the overall chemistry of the squad. Alessandro Maestri–the first Italian-born-and-developed pitcher signed by MLB in 2006 and infielder Alex Liddi–the first Italian-born-and-developed player to make his MLB debut in 2011 have benefitted greatly from Piazza’s guidance and mentorship.
Former Team Italia catcher Francisco Cervelli and manager Marco Mazzieri at Dodgertown in 2014,
Former Team Italia catcher Francisco Cervelli visits with manager Marco Mazzieri at Dodgertown during 2014 Spring Training (Photo by Claudio Vechi)

Maestri said, “It’s great to have him around in the dugout. He’s like doing this for fun. He enjoys working with us… That’s why we appreciate it so much. I think he is positively influencing the program that we have. The fact that the team is winning and improving proves it. So that’s why he keeps coming back.” Liddi echoed the sentiment and said, “When you have coaches like Mike Piazza and Frank Catalanotto—guys who have been in the big leagues for a long time—it makes it fun just to be around them. You’re able to ask them questions and learn from them.”

Bill Holmberg, Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto and Jason Grilli
Team Italia coaches Bill Holmberg, Mike Piazza, Frank Catalanotto with closer Jason Grilli
niashofExhibitBannerSm3RGB Piazza has been a proponent of uplifting and preserving his Italian cultural heritage by supporting the efforts of the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF), George Randazzo–founder of the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame and Roberto Angotti–curator of the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball Exhibition. Piazza befriended Angotti during the two weeks Team Italia spent in Phoenix preparing for the 2013 World Baseball Classic. When Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda dropped in on Team Italia’s practice at Dodgers’ Spring Training Camp in Glendale to address the team, Roberto knew he was on the frontline of the Italian baseball revolution. Lasorda’s emotionally-driven speech coupled with Piazza’s serious commitment inspired Angotti to share the experience with others through a traveling exhibit paying tribute to Italian American baseball.

Piazza said,”This commitment I have with the Italian Federation is something I really care about. I feel a strong tie to Italy, since my heritage is there. My grandfather Rosario came from Sciacca, Sicily, to the United States and my father grew me up following the Italian tradition pretty much. I think it’s in our DNA to strive to work hard and persevere. Most our ancestors came over to the United States with just the clothes on their back. I think that was the case with my grandfather, who had nothing in his pocket to start a life here in the U.S. When we have the strength and pride of the Italian family with the support we can give one another, it builds character and allows us to achieve our true potential. I don’t think there are a lot of Italian American families that don’t have strong support behind them. I do not pretend to say what is not true, I grew up as an American boy. Now, getting older, I understand the value of my heritage and I want to give something back to Italy.”

Artists Vincent Scilla and Christopher Paluso make rare appearance at Convivio in San Diego on 1/12

San Diegans are in for a Merry Christmas with Vincent Scilla and Christopher Paluso coming to town.
San Diegans were given a Christmas present with artists Vincent Scilla and Christopher Paluso in town.
The holidays may be over but San Diego is still celebrating since two of the most influential artists behind the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball Exhibition are speaking this weekend in America’s finest city. Traveling all the way from New York’s Greenwich Village is internationally-renowned sports artist Vincent Scilla. San Diego Hall of Champions resident artist and local favorite educator Christopher Paluso will host the visiting East Coast cultural icon on Sunday, January 12th at the Convivio Center in Little Italy.
Vincent Scilla's critically-acclaimed book "BASEBALL" was published by MQ Publications of London.
Vincent Scilla’s critically-acclaimed book “BASEBALL” was published by London’s MQ Publications.
Vincent Scilla will be speaking on the Italian American Experience on Sunday, January 12 in San Diego.
Artist Vincent Scilla speaks on the Italian American Experience on Sunday, January 12, 2014 at Convivio, 2157 India Street in San Diego’s charming Little Italy. He will be joined by San Diego Hall of Champions resident artist Christopher Paluso. Admission is free.
As a multi-talented painter, filmmaker, and photographer, Vincent Scilla has come a long way since graduating from college at the University of Michigan. During his illustrious four decade career, he has garnered countless accolades, grants, and honors for his fine craft. Beginning as a photographer, Scilla’s works were first showcased at the Detroit Institute of Art in 1969 as part of the prestigious Michigan Artists show. His images have graced the pages of the New York Times and the Village Voice. The experimental filmmaker and director of “Thunder in the Afternoon” and “Flyin’ No-Low Altitude” received numerous awards and noteworthy praise at popular film venues including the Collective Living for Cinema and the Ann Arbor Film Festival.
Vincent Scilla's "Pizza Lombardi" pays tribute to Italian American legend Ernie Lomabardi.
Vincent Scilla’s “Pizza Lombardi” pays tribute to Baseball Hall of Famer Ernie Lombardi and America’s first full-fledged pizzeria–Lombardi’s–which was established in New York in 1905.
Vincent Scila's "Pope" is featured in the Artists' Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball Exhibit.
Vincent Scilla’s “Pope Sun-Ripened Tomatoes” was painted in 1990. Industrial and agrarian meet as the country boy leaves the farm and comes to town.
Despite being a prolific artist in multimedia formats, Scilla’s artwork–particularly his baseball paintings–has received the most amount of notoriety. Measuring at 8.4″ x 10″ and printed using archival inkjet print on somerset velvet paper, Vincent’s baseball paintings highlight his subjects by utilizing popular advertisements to serve as the backdrop with a true vintage feeling. Ads from popular brands such as Krispy Kreme, Mercury Paint, Cracker Jack, Mobil Oil, White’s Dairy Bar and Ragu are included and used for various backdrops in some of the most unique baseball art anywhere.
Vincent Scilla's "Rocco Loved Ragu" was painted in 1989. All eyes are on the player in this Italian opera as the catcher circles under a pop-fly at center stage.
Vincent Scilla’s “Rocco Loved Ragu” was painted in 1989. All eyes are on the player in this Italian opera as the catcher circles under a pop-fly at center stage.
Although Vincent Scilla often fuses commercial advertising and baseball in his artwork, he has some strong feelings on the branding of our national pastime. In his personal blog, Scilla wrote: “Contrary to what MLB thinks, baseball does not belong to them. It’s not their property. It is the property of generations of Americans dating back nearly 200 years. It’s our mythology and legends. I don’t need Mastercard telling me that.” Having his work displayed in the pages of various books– including “Diamonds Are Forever”, “Treasury of Baseball”, “Baseball Postcard Box”, and “Top of the Ninth”–as well as at some of the best galleries and ballparks in America, the great Italian American artist Vincent Scilla is undoubtedly in a league of his own. See for yourself at Convivio.
Christopher Paluso created the official banner for the Artists' Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball
Christopher Paluso designed the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball banner.
Christopher Paluso is a proud Italian American artist.
Christopher Paluso is a proud Italian American.
Christopher Paluso is a native San Diegan, an internationally recognized sports artist, illustrator and educator. Entrusted to create the images of their honored members, he is the Official Artist of the San Diego Hall of Champions’ Brietbard Hall of Fame, the San Diego Holiday Bowl Hall of Fame, the Hawthorne Race Course Jockey Hall of Fame, the Missouri Valley Conference Hall of Fame, and the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame. Known for his ability to capture a strong real life likeness of his prized subjects, he has gained a massive amount of respect within the world of sports as well as kudos from insiders within the aerospace and entertainment industries.
Legends Magazine cover featuring Joe DiMaggio and Don Mattingingly by Christopher Paluso
Legends Magazine cover featuring Joe DiMaggio and Don Mattingingly by Christopher Paluso
Paluso’s artworks of Muhammed Ali, Mickey Mantle, Joe DiMaggio, Wayne Gretzky, and Michael Jordan are among his most sought-after pieces. His art has been seen on everything from magazine covers to limited edition collector plates and lithographs. In addition to being one of top Italian American artists of our time, Paluso shares his craft with San Diego youth and adults working as an instructor teaching art at area public schools and the Convivio Center. Paluso’s love for his Italian heritage is apparent in his illustrations in the Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball exhibition.
Christopher Paluso and CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto at the Grand Opening of Artists' Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball
Christopher Paluso poses with CBS News Anchor Carlo Cecchetto at the Grand Opening of the
Artists’ Tribute to Italian Americans in Baseball at the Convivio Center on September 25, 2013.
Perhaps one of Christopher Paluso’s most memorable moments took place when he was privately commissioned to create a painting of Joe DiMaggio for a lithograph project in 1992. Paluso consulted with DiMaggio to get his vision depicting him as the complete ballplayer that he had been known and loved for. Just before the great Joe D passed away, he saw the image on the cover of the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame magazine “Red, White & Green”. According to those close to DiMaggio, it was reported that he was very pleased with the design.
Christopher Paluso designed this cover of the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame magazine “Red, White & Green”
Christopher Paluso designed this cover for the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame.
Convivio serves as the home for lovers of all things Italian in San Diego.
The Convivio Center serves as the home for lovers of all things Italian in San Diego.
Paluso is offering an eight-week “Drawing Italian Style” class at the Convivio Center beginning Monday, January 6th at 7 pm. Borrowing from Italian Renaissance masters da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael, students will learn about art history while discovering their individual creativity and unleashing the Italian in all of us. In addition to drawing shapes, using the value scale, proportions, and experimenting with one- and two-point perspective drawing, the very popular artist and illustrator will provide step-by-step instruction in the foundations of drawing, elements and principles of design as well as in the creation of classic-style drawings. For more information on the drawing class and the Vincent Scilla/Christopher Paluso meet-and-greet on Sunday, January 12th at 6:30 pm, visit http://www.ConvivioSociety.org or phone 619-573-4140.ConvivioEventsRGB-1